WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous Type Questions

Miscellaneous Type Questions Find The Odd Out

 

Question 1. Sideline: McMohan Line: Radcliffe Line: Durand Line
Answer: Sideline (not a boundary demarcation line)

Question 2. Himadri Himalaya: Himachal Himalaya: Karakoram: Siwalik Himalaya
Answer: Karakoram (not a part of the Himalayas)

Question 3. Malwa: Aravalli: Bundelkhand: Chotanagpur
Answer: Aravalli (not a plateau)

Question 4. Khadar: Bhangar: Bet: Black soil
Answer: Black soil (not a type of alluvial soil)

Question 5. Basak: Indian snakeroot (Sarpagandha): Sandal: Kalmegh
Answer: Sandal (not a medicinal plant)

Question 6. Sunderbans: Gorumara: Jaldapara: Kanha
Answer: Kanha (not in West Bengal)

Question 7. Mustard: Sunflower: Sesame: Mulberry
Answer: Mulberry (not an oilseed)

Question 8. Santhal : Odiya : Khasi: Kol
Answer: Odiya (not a tribe)

 

Correct The Following

Question 1. The Arabian Sea lies to the east of India.
Answer: Bay Of Bengal

Question 2. In India ‘Forestry Day’ is observed from the 2nd to the 8th of October.
Answer: ‘Wildlife Week’

Question 3. Step cultivation is very popular in northeast India.
Answer: Jhum

Question 4. The Blue Revolution brought about high yields in agricultural production.
Answer: Green

Question 5. Santhal is the largest tribal community in India.
Answer: Gond

Question 6. The main festival of Buddhists is Holi.
Answer: Buddha Purnima

 

Scrambled Words

1. LAYASMAHI
2. KKHIBAIALSHA
3. FERNIOUSCO
4. RAMRAKAKO
4. RRAJICHEPUN
5. VEIGNRESO

Answer:

1. HIMALAYAS
2. KARAKORAM
3. KALBAISHAKHI
4. CHERRAPUNJI
5. CONIFEROUS
6. SOVEREIGN

 

Tabulate The Following

The table below shows months and one special characteristic of climate during that month. On the basis of this, choose the appropriate answer from the answer box.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions Table of 1

Answer:
1. Monsoon
2. Winter
3. Autumn
4. Summer

Fill Up The Blanks In The Knowledge Hive

Question Fill in the Knowledge hive with information on the formation of soil

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions knowledge hive

Answer:

1. The composition and colour of the soil mainly depend on the parent rock.
2. Organic materials such as leaves, roots and flowers from the plants and organisms like bacteria and earthworms play a major role in the formation of soil.
3. The nature of the soil depends on the climate in which it is formed.
4. Time plays a prominent role in soil formation.
5. Relief also plays a determining role in soil formation.

 

Answer With Reference To The Illustration

Question 1. In the given map, the Northern Sircar Coast is marked. Note down the names of the other coasts according to the marked numbers.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions the northern sircar coast

Answer:

1. Coromandel Coast
2. Malabar Coast
3. Karnataka Coast
4. Konkan Coast
5. Bay of Bengal
6. Arabian Sea

Question 2. The given diagram depicts the flow of the river Ganga. Mark the names of the important places on the course of the river.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions the river ganga

Answer:

1. Yamunotri
2. Gangotri
3. Allahabad (Prayagraj)
4. Bhagirathi-Hooghly
5. Padma
6. Bay Of Bengal

Question 3. The monsoon winds are depicted in the following illustration. Name the type of monsoon wind shown by 1 and 2.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions north-east monsoon winds

Answer:

1. South-west Monsson winds
2. Winds Of Western Disturbances

Question 4. The diagram below shows the region where black soil is found. The numbered boxes indicate the direction from the given region. Write the kinds of soils that are found in the marked regions.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions peninsular black soil

 

Answer:

1. Alluvial soil from northern India
2. Red soil from the central part of India
3. Red soil from the south of India

 

Crossword

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions crossword

Clues:______________

Across: ________________

1. Largest River Island.
2. Depression between two mountains.
3. A northeastern state.
4. Brahmaputra in China.
5. Very slow-moving mass of ice.

Down:________________

6. Highest point on earth.
7. Longest river in India.
8. Place of origin of river Ganges.
9. Sea located west of India.
10. Largest glacier in India.

Answer:

Across:_____________

1. Majuli
2. Valley,
3. Aruna- Chal Pradesh,
4. Tsangpo,
5. Glacier

Down:_____________

6. Everest,
7. Ganga,
8. Gomukh,
9. Arabian Sea,
10. Siachen

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions crossword 2

Clues:________________

Across:________________

1. Sanctuary in West Bengal where both rhinoceros and elephants are found.
3. Tidal forests found in coastal areas of India.
6. State of India receives rainfall twice a year.
8. A forest consisting of trees, that do not shed their leaves and remain green all year round.

Down:________________

2. Wettest place on earth.
4. Revolution in agriculture.
5. The soil which is rich in iron oxide and red in colour formed in hot and wet tropical areas.
7. Hot and dry wind blowing in the daytime during summer.
9. National Park in Gujarat which is the only natural habitat for the Asiatic Lion.

Answer:

1. Jaldapara,
3. Mangrove,
6. Tamil Nadu,
8. Evergreen

Down:_____________

2. Mawsynram,
4. Green,
5. Late Rite,
7. Loo,
9. Gir

 

Find the Answers Write Down

1. Summer: Mango: Winter: Orange

2. Mountainous Temperate Forests Pine: Tropical Deciduous Forest: Teak

3. Tea cultivation: Slopes Paddy cultivation: Plain Land

4. Kaziranga National Park: Rhinoceroses: Gir National Park: Lion

5. Mangrove: West Bengal: Mountainous Temperate Forests: Himachal Pradesh

6. High Blood Pressure: Sarapagandha : Malaria: Cinchona.

7. Alluvial soil: Paddy: Black soil: Cotton

 

Application On Maps

Question 1. Practice writing down the names of states and their capitals by looking at a state-divided map of India.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography miscellaneous type Questions indian political map

 

Question 2. Suppose you are about to travel from one state of India to another. Find out from the map which of the states you have to cross. You can choose other cities and play this game with your friends
Answer:

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions from one city to anthor cities

Question 3. Make a list of the names of some sanctuaries and national parks of different states of our country.
Answer:

Sanctuaries of different states are follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions name of sanctuary state

National parks of different states follow-

 

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions name of national park

 

Advanced Questions And Answers

Question 1. Why is India called a subcontinent?
Answer:

India called a Subcontinent:

India is called a subcontinent for the following reasons:

1. Huge areal extent: The Indian subcontinent has an area that is almost equal to that of a continent. So, it can easily be called a subcontinent.

2. Physical diversity: Talking from the point of physical geography, the Indian landmass has both—a region that has formed from an ancient shield as well as young fold mountains.

At the same time, the delta regions have new soil. Also, there is great diversity in the physiography with mountains, hills, plateau lands and vast plains which lend a distinctness to this region.

3. Climatic diversity: Different parts of the Indian subcontinent experience different kinds of climate – from equatorial to monsoon to montane to desert climate types. This diverse variety is usually not seen even on some continents.

4. Cultural diversity: People of various ethnicities, believing in various faiths, and speaking diverse languages can be found in India. This is proof of the great cultural diversity of the landmass.

Question 2. Write a short note on Social Forestry.
Answer:

Social Forestry:

Social forestry is the management of forests for the benefit of rural communities. It includes the planting of trees on barren lands for the purpose of social and rural development, forest management and protection.

Its main objective is to raise plantations by the common man to meet the growing demand for fuel wood, fodder, etc. and thus reducing the pressure off traditional forest areas.

The lands which are used for social forestry are—

  1. land near rivers and canals,
  2. bare land beside the railway tracks and roads,
  3. barren lands near mine areas,
  4. open lands near schools, offices and temples.
  5. Social forestry helps to increase the yield of different kinds of wood.

Question 3. What is meant by plantation crops?
Answer:

Plantation crops:

Cash crops which are cultivated over a large area on an extensive scale are known as plantation crops.

Cost per unit of production decreases with an increase in the operational side of these plantations.

These crops are mostly grown for far-away markets, rather than local markets. The common plantation crops in India are tea, coffee and sugarcane.

Question 4. What is meant by multiple cropping?
Answer:

Multiple cropping:

Multiple cropping is a practice in agriculture where two or more crops are grown in a single growing season on the same piece of land.

Multiple cropping is generally of two types—

Crop rotation and inter-cropping. A very common example of multiple cropping is growing tomatoes followed by onions and then marigolds.

Marigold repels some of the pests that are specific to the tomato plant and so, this works out to be a useful combination.

Formative

Participation: This segment will indicate how much the students have actively participated and taken initiative during the class.

Question 1. What do you see in the picture?

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions Soil erision
Answer: This is a picture of soil erosion. This picture depicts that the top layer of soil has been eroded in a vegetation-less area due to the flow of surface water. This is known as Gully erosion. This type of region is called badlands.

(Interpretation and Application): This segment will test whether the students have understood the topics or whether they are just mugging up.

Question 1. Collect information about the people of India and fill up the empty

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions people of india

Answer: Various information about the people of India is as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions various information about people of india

Question 2. There are many festivals, local musical traditions, folk culture and heritage in our state. Collect information and pictures about a special heritage of your region.
Answer: I am Shilpa Mondal. I live in Shantiniketan of the Bolpur sub-division of Birbhum district. Rabindranath Tagore’s Shantiniketan is a special heritage of our area.

I have collected some pictures and information about Shantiniketan. These are as follows—

Chhatimtala: Maharshi Debendranath Tagore, the father of Rabindranath Tagore, meditated under the Chhatim tree.

Upasana Griha (Prayer Hall): It is one of the most stunning features of Shantiniketan. This hall is decorated with Belgian glass of different colours.

This hall is also called Kanch Mandir. The hall is adorned with candles every evening, accentuating its beauty.

Dehali: Rabindranath Tagore used to live in this two-storeyed house along with his wife Mrinalini Devi.

Cheena Bhavan: It is an institute of Chinese Language and culture. Nandalal Bose supervised the decoration of this bhavan with scenes from the play ‘Notir Puja’.

Shantiniketan Griha: It is the oldest building of Shantiniketan. Debendranath Tagore built this house as a symbol of the amalgamation of all religions.

Uttarayan: It is the housing complex where Tagore used to live. The entire complex is divided into many buildings of various architectural styles.

Shyamali: It is a mud house. Gandhiji stayed with his wife in this house during his visit to Shantiniketan.

Udayan: It is the largest building in Shantiniketan where Rabindranath spent his last days.

Museum: The premises of Uttarayan houses a museum where several of Rabindranath’s belongings are preserved.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions various places of shantiniketan

 

Question 3. Identify the soils and write down two characteristics of each.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions types of soils

Answer: The name and Characteristics of these identified soils are-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions name of soil

Question 4. Study the soil of your region and find out—

Question 1. What is the colour of the soil?
Answer: The colour of the soil— Grey and dark-coloured.

Question 2. Is the soil fine or coarse-grained?
Answer: Grain size— fine-grained.

Question 3. Is the soil too hard or soft?
Answer:  Hardness—

  1. Soft when wet,
  2. but very hard when dried up.

Question 4. What are the plants that grow in the soil?
Answer: Suitable plants—

  1. Mango, Peachtree,
  2. Jack fruit,
  3. Banyan,
  4. Tamarind,
  5. Bamboo,
  6. etc.

Question 5. Which crops are cultivated in the soil?
Answer: Suitable crops—

  1. Paddy,
  2. Jute,
  3. Pulses,
  4. Sesame,
  5. Mustard,
  6. Vegetables, etc.

Question 6. What are the uses of the soil?
Answer: Uses of the soil—

  1. Building mud houses,
  2. Brick manufacturing, Idol making, Pottery, etc.

Questioning and Experimentation: This segment will investigate the student’s understanding of the subject, questioning capacity, ability to explain and apply and urge for experimentation.

Direction: Answer the following questions—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions and Answers

Empathy and Cooperation: This segment will determine the ability of students to cooperate and help others within a group.

Question 1. Make a poster with your friends on preventing tree felling.
Answer:

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions tree feeling

Aesthetics and Creativity: This segment will check the aesthetic sense and creativity of the students.

Question 1. Imagine the physical features of the places that Piyali and Soumya would be visiting and write them down in your own language.
Answer:

The physical features of the places that Piyali and Soumya would be visiting are—

Piyali is visiting Shimla: Piyali and her family will be visiting Shimla during the summer vacation. Shimla, in the northern Himalayan mountainous region, is a hill city and capital of Himachal Pradesh.

It is situated at an altitude of 2400 metres above sea level. The climate in Shimla is cool throughout the year. It snows here generally in the winter. The roads are very narrow.

Rivers rush swiftly due to the steep slope of the mountainous regions. Pleasant weather and the beauty of nature attract tourists from all over the globe.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions shimala rajasthan

Soumya is visiting Rajasthan: Soumya and his family are visiting Rajasthan during the Christmas vacation. Rajasthan, situated in north-western India is a desert state and the largest state in India in terms of area.

The Thar Desert is in this state. During the day it is very hot and the nights are cold. Extremities of temperature are a common phenomenon here.

The desert region is full of sand and stones. Agricultural activities are less here due to the paucity of water. Deserts are almost vegetation, except for some thorny bushes and shrubs.

Rivers are short-coursed and non-perennial in nature. A large number of tourists visit Rajasthan mainly in winter.

Question 2. Write down in your own language the differences you notice among the soil by the riverside, the soil near ponds and waterbodies in your area, the soil in your school or playground, the soil by the roadside and that in the pots in gardens, with respect to their colour, hardness, texture (fine or coarse-grained).
Answer:

I am Sayantani Biswas. I live in Balagarh block of Hooghly district.

I have observed different soils of different areas in my block and the main characteristics of these soils are listed here—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions site of sample collection

Question 3. Collect a few soil samples from places near and around your place. Mix water separately to each of these and observe whether you find each of the samples different or not.
Answer:

I am Pramugdha Dutta. I live in the city of Chandannagar in the Hooghly district. I have identified three spots around my house and collected some soil samples from each of these.

These samples have been mixed in water separately. Now, the information I got after mixing soil samples in water, has been charted below—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Miscellaneous type questions samples diffrent or not

Question 4. Many other tribal people (apart from the ones we’ve read about) live in our country. Learn about them and discuss them with your friends.
Answer:

A model conversation regarding the question has been discussed below—

Arpita: I have seen the Kadar tribal people on television recently. They live in the Western Ghats region of Kerala. Has anyone heard about them?

Sayantan: Yes! I know about them too. They make ropes using spinaches and shrubs and sell them to the farmers. Moreover, they gather fruits, honey, and wax for their livelihood.

Arpita: Yes! You are absolutely right! But their population is fast declining. Do you know about any other tribal community in our country?

Sayantan: Yes, I have also heard about the Gujjar people of Jammu and Kashmir. They are nomads and animal rearers. They speak Urdu and Gujari to communicate among themselves.

They are nowadays engaged in agriculture, and people who have migrated to cities are engaged in various occupations.

Arpita: Wow! I haven’t heard about them before. Thanks, Sayantan! Kankan. Arpita, we had travelled to Andaman and Nicobar Islands during the last puja.

There we came to know about the Sentinelese people. Do you know, they are very few in number left on Earth.

They refuse any interactions with outsiders. They are mainly hunters or gatherers.

Arpita: Good! We got so much information about different tribal communities. Thank you, everybody.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale Direction Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale Direction Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1. Describe The essential Components of a map.
Answer:

The essential Components of a map:

There are certain components without which a map is considered to be incomplete.

These essential components of a map are as follows—

Proper direction (North line):

On an upright map, the North is on the top, the South is at the bottom, the East is on the right-hand side and the West is on the left-hand side. The north line of a map confirms these directions.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Determination of earth

Scale:

A scale provides an accurate relation between the map distance and the ground distance between two particular points.

A study should always be true to scale. Various forms of scales can be used on a map based on their uses.

Symbols:

Symbols are used to depict information on a thematic map because of space restrictions.

These symbols can be lines, shapes, figures or colours to depict various things on the map. These are collectively called conventional symbols or signs.

Index:

The index on a map explains these symbols in a small box or table in any one of the corners of the map. The index of a map is also known as a legend or key.

Title:

A title is an absolute necessity for a map. This explains in brief the content of the map.

Content generally includes the name of the place in which the map is drawn, along with the type of map drawn. For example, ‘Weather map of India’.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. What is the importance of a scale in a map?
Answer:

The importance of a scale in a map:

Scale is an essential component for drawing any map true to its sizes and with the use of a small or a large scale, a detailed (large scale) or a not-so-detailed (small scale/medium scale) map can be drawn.

The actual ground distance and area of a region can be found accurately using a scale. The scale of a map is determined based on the purpose for which it is being drawn. A map used to locate the rivers in a country may be a small-scale map.

However, the map used to study and use a village is essentially a large-scale map.

Question 2. How many types of maps can we delineate according to scale?
Answer:

Types of maps can we delineate according to scale:

Maps are usually delineated into two categories according to their scales.

They are as follows—

Small-scale maps:

Small-scale maps depict a large area, such as an entire country.

To show an entire country, the map has to be drawn on a smaller scale. The details depicted on a small-scale map would be lesser than a large-scale map.

Aliases, wall maps and others are examples of small-scale maps. Map scales that are usually like 1cm = 250 km are known as small-scale maps.

Large-scale maps:

Large-scale maps depict a small area. The details depicted on a large-scale map are more than on a small-scale map.

Cadastral maps or village maps are ideal examples of large-scale maps. Mapscalesthatare usually likes lcm = 2 km known as large-scale maps.

Question 3. What are the advantages of large-scale maps?
Answer:

The advantages of large-scale maps are as follows—

Drawn on a large scale:

Large-scale maps are drawn to depict a small area with proper magnification.

Detailed information:

This map provides detailed information about a region.

Concept of physical and cultural aspects:

Reading large-scale maps gives an idea about the physical and cultural aspects of a region.

Question 4. What are the disadvantages of small-scale maps?
Answer:

The disadvantages of small-scale maps are as follows—

Drawn on a small scale:

A small-scale map shows a large area in a small map. So all the details of a region can not be shown on this type of map.

Less informative:

Not much information are available from this map.

Lack of detailed ideas:

Reading a small-scale map does not give a detailed idea about the physical and cultural aspects of the region.

Question 5. Write The difference between a large-scale map and a small-scale map
Answer:

The differences between a large-scale map and a small-scale map are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps large scale and small scales maps

Question 6. How to measure the distance between two points on the map?

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Two Points on the map

Answer: First we have to join the two points on the map with a straight line and measure the distance between them using a scale.

In the given picture, X and Y are the two points and the distance between these two points is 3cm.

The scale of the map reads as lcm = 100m /. 3cm on map, would be = 3x100m = 300m on ground.

Thus, the ground distance between the two points, X and Y is 300m.

Question 7. A map is drawn with a scale of 1cm = 20 km. What would be the actual ground distance between two places whose map distance is 3 cm on this map?
Answer:

The scale of the map reads as 1cm = 20 km. This means, 1cm on the map measures 20 km on the ground. Therefore, 3cm on the map would measure 20 x 3 = 60 km on the ground.

Question 8. Determine the scale of a map, if the map distance between two places is 10cm and the actual ground distance is 200km.
Answer:

Here, 10cm of map distance represents 200km of ground distance.

Therefore, 1cm of map distance would represent 200/10 = 20km of ground distance.

Thus, the actual ground distance between the two places would be 60km.

Hence, the scale of the map reads as 1cm = 20km.

Question 9. Differentiate between a wall map and an atlas.
Answer:

The differences between a wall map and an atlas are as follows—

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Wall map atlats

 

Question 10. Why does India look bigger on the map of Asia than on the world map? 
Answer:

The world map is drawn using a small scale so that all countries and cities can be located properly. On such a map, incorporating a lot of information is not possible.

Here, the size of India would be smaller, so that only the states and important cities are visible.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps india of world map and map of asia

On the other hand, on a map of Asia, of the same size as the paper, only one continent is drawn.

Thus, more details can be incorporated and the size of the countries would also be comparatively big than on a world map. So, India would appear bigger.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. What Is meant by scale?
Answer:

Scale:

The scale of a map is the specific ratio in which the actual part of the Earth is reduced and shown on a map.

The scale can also be defined as the ratio of the distance between any two points on the map and that on the ground.

For example, if the scale shows 1cm = 1km, then it means that the 1cm distance on the map corresponds to the 1km distance on the ground. So, the map is a miniature version of the ground reality.

Question 2. Describe the functions of a scale.
Answer:

The functions of a scale are listed below:

  1. It is an essential component of any map true to size.
  2. With a small or a large scale, a detailed (large scale) or a not-so-detailed (small scale/medium scale) map can be drawn.
  3. The actual ground distance and area of a region can be calculated accurately using a scale.

Question 3. What is meant by a small-scale map?
Answer:

Small-scale map:

Small scale map depicts a large area, such as an entire country or continent. To show such a vast region, the map has to be drawn on a smaller scale.

The details depicted on a small-scale map would be lesser than a large-scale map. Aliases, wall maps and others are examples of small-scale maps. Scales of small-scale maps are usually like 1cm = 250km.

Question 4. What is meant by a large-scale map?
Answer:

Large-scale map:

A large-scale map depicts a small area. The details depicted on a large-scale map would be more than a small-scale map. Cadastral maps or village maps are ideal examples of large-scale maps.

Scales are usually like 1cm = 2km on large-scale maps.

Question 5. What is meant by a medium-scale map?
Answer:

Medium-scale map:

A medium-scale map meets the gap between a small-scale map and a large-scale map.

Though it lacks detailed landmarks that can be used for travelling or any other detailed study, it is useful for planning purposes.

Scales that usually range between 1cm = 0.5 km to 1cm = 1km are known as medium-scale maps. Topographical maps are drawn on a medium scale.

Question 6. How can the entire world or a portion of the world ideally be depicted through a map?
Answer:

The entire world or a portion of the world ideally be depicted through a map:

We are incapable of seeing the entire world as a whole, at a time. So, a map is the only way where we can view the entire world in detail.

It is also not possible to find a paper as big as the Earth, to draw a map. So a map is drawn accurately to a scale that is in ratio to the actual ground distance.

Question 7. How does one determine the direction on a map?
Answer:

On an upright map—

North is on the top, south is at the bottom, east is on the right-hand side and West is on the left-hand side. A north line is also included on a map to confirm the directions.

Question 8. How can we determine direction by facing the sun?
Answer:

We Can determine direction by facing the sun:

The Sun rises in the east. The exact opposite direction is known to be the west.

As we stand facing the morning sun, the right-hand side would be the south and the left-hand side would be the north.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Determination of direction facing the sun

Question 9. What are the essentials components of a map?
Answer:

The essential components of a map are as follows—

  1. Proper direction (North line),
  2. Scale,
  3. Latitudes and longitudes,
  4. Conventional signs and symbols,
  5. Legend,
  6. Title.

Question 10. What is meant by an index on a map?
Answer:

Index on a map:

In thematic maps, the use of specific colours, signs, symbols and letters is required. The index on a map explains these symbols in a small box or table in any one of the corners of the map.

The index of a map is also called a legend or key.

Question 11. To study a topographical map, the knowledge of conventional signs is essential. Why?
Answer:

To study a topographical map, the knowledge of conventional signs is essential

A topographical map shows different physical landscape features. It is a medium-scale map that gives detailed information about the place.

To denote these features, various conventional signs and symbols are used as assigned by the Survey of India authority.

To study a topographical map, the knowledge of conventional signs is essential, without which the map cannot be interpreted.

Question 12. Determine the route that you should follow while returning from your school.
Answer:

The route that I should follow while returning from your school:

I first need to determine the distance from my school to my house in order to determine the route. Now I need to determine the direction in which I need to walk.

The next step would be determining certain important landmarks to my east and west. This entire procedure will help me to determine and finalise my route while returning from my school.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. The Map Of The World Is A—

  1. Small Scale Map
  2. Medium Scale Map
  3. Large Scale Map

Answer: 1. Small-Scale Map

Question 2. Which One Of The Following Is A Large Scale?

  1. 1cm To 1000km
  2. 1cm To 500km
  3. 1cm To 2km

Answer: 2. 1cm To 500km

Question 3. Map Distance Is Always Land Area.

  1. Larger Than
  2. Smaller Than
  3. Same As

Answer: 2. Smaller Than

Question 4. An Arrow In A Map Generally Indicates—

  1. North Direction
  2. South Direction
  3. West Direction

Answer: 1. North Direction

Question 5. The Instrument That Aids In Determining The Direction Of A Place, Is Known As—

  1. Scale
  2. Globe
  3. Compass

Answer: 3. Compass

Question 6. ‘= = = =’ Symbols Is Used In Map To Denote—

  1. Metalled Road
  2. International Border
  3. Unmetalled Road

Answer: 3. Unmetalled Road

Question 7. Symbol Is Used In Map To Denote A Post Office.

  1. Ps
  2. Po
  3. To

Answer: 2. Po

Question 8. Conventional Signs And Symbols Are Used—

  1. Locally
  2. Nationally
  3. Internationally

Answer: 3. Internationally

Question 9. Is An Important Part Of A Map, But Not An Essential Element.

  1. Scale
  2. Colour
  3. Title

Answer: 2. Colour

Question 10. Hills And Mountains Are Shown On Map In—

  1. Red
  2. Brown
  3. Yellow

Answer: 2. Brown

Question 11. Agricultural Areas Are Demarcated In On A Map.

  1. Red
  2. Brown
  3. Yellow

Answer: 3. Yellow

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Fill In The Blanks

Question 1. _______________ is the ratio between the map distance and ground distance.
Answer: Scale

Question 2. ‘N’ denotes the_______________ on a map.
Answer: North direction

Question 3. _______________ can be accurately determined with the help of a compass.
Answer: Direction

Question 4. _______________ in the night sky helps us to Determine the north.
Answer: North star

Question 5. When we face the Sun, our right-hand side is the_______________ side.
Answer: Southern

Question 6. _______________ Delhi is located on the side of the map of India.
Answer: Northern

Question 7. Colour is used to_______________ denote a pond or a lake on a map.
Answer: Blue

Question 8. Human settlements are shown in_______________ Colour on a map.
Answer: Red

Question 9. _______________ is key to all symbols used on a map.
Answer: Index

Question 10._______________ provides an idea of the subject explained on a map.
Answer: Title

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Write True Or False

Question 1. The ratio between map distance and ground distance is known as cartogram.
Answer: False

Question 2. A cadastral map is a small-scale map.
Answer: False

Question 3. In a cadastral map, 16 inches = 1 mile.
Answer: True

Question 4. Large-scale maps give more information.
Answer: True

Question 5. For the precise determination of the location of a place, both distance and direction are essential.
Answer: True

Question 6. Both the sketch and plan of a place are similar things.
Answer: False

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Match The Columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps match the following
Answer: 1-C,2-A,3-E,4-B,5-D

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Answer In One Or Two Words

Question 1. Name an essential element of a map.
Answer: Scale.

Question 2. A statement scale of a map reads as 1cm to 2.5km. What is the ground distance here?
Answer: 2.5km.

Question 3. In which direction does a compass always point?
Answer: North.

Question 4. Mention the intercardinal points.
Answer: North-east, south-east, north-west, south-west.

Question 5. What is the easiest method to identify direction?
Answer: Observing the sunrise and sunset.

Question 6. Which will be the hand side of a map?
Answer: West direction.

Question 7. On which side of the Prime Meridian is Kolkata located?
Answer: East.

Question 8. Which colour is used to represent mountains on a globe?
Answer: Brown.

Question 9. Which colour is used to demarcate the ocean bodies on a globe?
Answer: Blue.

Question 10. Which colour is used to demarcate the forest areas on a map?
Answer: Green.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic B Scale, Direction, Conventional Symbols And Elements Of A Maps Miscellaneous Type Questions Find The Odd Out

Question 1. Population map: Weather map: Vegetation map: Geological map
Answer: Population map (not a physical map)

Question 2. Map: Cartography: Atlas: Cloud cover
Answer: Benchmark (not related to map making)

Question 3. Wall map: Atlas: Cadastral map: Globe
Answer: Cadastral map (not a small-scale map)

 

Correct The Following

Question 1. Rail lines and roadways are shown on a physical map.
Answer: Thematic map

Question 2. Mountains and hills are shown on a political map.
Answer: Physical map

Question 3. The first atlas was Eratosthenes.
Answer: Ortelius

Question 4. City maps are small-scale maps.
Answer: Large

Question 5. The colour green is used to demarcate waterbodies on a map.
Answer: Blue

 

Who Am I?

Question 1. I am capable of depicting a large area, such as an entire country in an accurately smaller version. Who am I?
Answer: Small-scale map

Question 2. I am a map that illustrates the administrative boundaries of countries, states, cities and towns. Who am I?
Answer: Political map

Question 3. I am the first person to use the term ‘Atlas1 for a collection of maps. Who am I?
Answer: Flemish geographer and cartographer, Gerardus Mercator

Question 4. I represent the record of ownership of land and I usually bear a scale of 16 inches = 1 mile in India. Who am I?
Answer: Cadastral map

Question 5. I am a clay tablet—currently a treasure of the collection at the British Museum. Who am I?
Answer: Imago Mundi (Babylonian world map)

 

Fill Up The Blanks In The Knowledge Hive

Question 1. Fill in the knowledge hive with information on a physical map.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Knowledge hive

Answer:

1. The physical characteristics of the Earth are represented on this map.
2. A separate map can be drawn with every physical element.
3. Geological maps, soil maps, and weather maps are all examples of this type of map.
4. Separate maps drawn from it depicting different elements are examples of thematic maps.

 

Answer With Reference To The Illustration

Question 1. Write them down correctly.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Down Correctly

Answer:

Clues: A is located northwest of B.

T is located in the U.
O is located in the of P.
To the southwest of X is located

Answer:

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Directions

 

Crossword

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Crossword
Clues:________________

Down:_________________

1. The oldest known map was discovered here.
2. He is a Greek God after whom the first book of maps was named.
3. The first modern atlas was published by him.
4. Mineral distribution is shown by this type of map.

Across:________________

5. This is the art of making maps.
6. This is the ratio between map distance and ground distance.

Answer:

Down:__________________

1. Babylon,
2. Atlas,
3. Ortelius,
4. Thematic

Across:________________

5. Cartography,
6. Scale

 

Advanced Questions And Answers

Question 1. Classify the various types of scales.
Answer: A scale provides the accurate ratio of the map distance and the ground distance between two points. According to cartography, scales are usually classified into three divisions.

They are as follows:

Statement scale or Verbal scale: This scale is described in simple language.

For example, if the scale says, ‘one centimetre is equal to one kilometre’, then we can instantly understand that the one-centimetre distance on the map corresponds to one kilometre on the ground.

Interpreting this scale needs no technical knowledge. The only disadvantage is that it is elaborate.

Representative fraction or Ratio scale:

This scale represents a fraction or a ratio. For example, if the scale says, ‘1:50,000’, this means 1 unit of distance on the map is equal to 50,000 units (same unit) of distance on the ground.

There are two important advantages of this scale. First, any unit according to personal convenience can be used and second, it is convenient to accommodate on the map.

A disadvantage of this scale is that nongeographers find it difficult to use.

Graphical scale:

This scale looks like a ruler, with graduations marked on it. One side of the scale represents the map distance, whereas the other side represents the ground distance.

There are two important advantages of this scale.

First, it is easy to use and second, if the map size is reduced or enlarged, the scale automatically changes accordingly, yet remains accurate.

The disadvantage of this scale is that nongeographers find it difficult to use.

 

Formative

(Participation): This segment will indicate how much the students have actively participated and taken initiative during the class.

Find out the political map of your state from a map book. Write them down correctly—

Question 1. How many districts are there?
Answer: Presently, there are 23 districts in our state.

Question 2. In which district do you live?
Answer: I live in the Hooghly district.

Question 3. What are the names of your surrounding districts?
Answer: The surrounding districts of my district are—

  1. Purba Bardhaman,
  2. Nadia,
  3. North 24 Parganas, Howrah.

Question 4. What is the capital of your state?
Answer: Kolkata is the capital of my state.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Political map of west bengal

Interpretation and Application: This segment will test whether the students have understood topics or whether they are just mugging up.

Question 1. Try to understand and write it down.
Answer:

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions distance on amap

Question 2. Look at the political map of India. Find out in which direction from Delhi are the following cities located.

  1. Kolkata, South-east,
  2. Mumbai, South-west,
  3. Chennai, South,
  4. Bengaluru South

Question 3. Look carefully at the political map of India. Can you say—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions india rivers

Question 1. What is the scale of the map?
Answer: The scale of the map is 1cm = 200km.

Question 2. What are the distances between India’s northernmost and southernmost point and between its easternmost and westernmost point?
Answer: The distance between India’s northernmost and southernmost points is 3214km and the same between easternmost and westernmost points is 2933km.

Question 3. What is the ground distance between Delhi and Kolkata and between Mumbai and Chennai according to the map scale?
Answer: According to the scale mentioned in the map above, the ground distances between Delhi and Kolkata and between Chennai and Bengaluru are 1288km and 1008km respectively.

Question 4. One can learn about India’s main rivers from this map. Would it have been possible to show all these rivers together if they were no maps?

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions political map in india

Answer: No, it would not have been possible to show all these rivers together if there were no map. There are numerous rivers in our vast country.

Only a river map can represent all these rivers together.

Question 5. The map shows the road from Subho’s house to his school.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Subho's house to his school

Question 1. But how far is the house from school?
Answer: Subho crosses a total distance of (P to Q), (Q to R) and (R to S) to go from his house to school.

These distances on the map measured with a scale are 1cm, 5cm and 2cm respectively. Therefore total map distance is 1cm + 5cm + 2cm = 8cm.

Now, the map scale is 1cm to 100m. Hence, the total ground distance from Subho’s house to school is (8 x 100m) = 800m.

Question 2. Does Subho reach school by walking for 10 minutes or does it take an hour?
Answer: Since the distance between Subho’s house and his school is 800m, it takes him 10 minutes to walk and reach his school.

Question 3. Look there is a scale drawn on the right side of the map. You can get answers to all questions from this scale. How?
Answer: We can measure any distance with the help of a given scale. There is a scale drawn on the right side of the map, which has helped to calculate the distance.

Measure the distance between Subho’s house and the hospital with a centimetre scale. Now you need to know the scale of the map.

Question 3. The scale given below the map shows a distance of 100m as 1cm.
Answer: This means that if the distance between two places is Answer: 1cm on the map, the actual distance between them is (1x100m) = 100m.

So if the distance between ‘A’ and ‘B’ is em, then the actual distance between them is (‘ ‘x 100m) =’ ‘m.
The map distance between ‘A’ and ‘B’ is 1cm, then the actual distance between them is (T x 100m) = ‘lOO’m.

Question 4. We now know the distance between Subho’s house and school. But how can we know which direction the school is from Subho’s house?
Answer: There is an ‘N’ sign on the right side of the map. This denotes the north direction.

Now we can easily recognise that Subho’s school is towards the northeast direction with respect to his house. So Subho’s house is located in the northeast direction of the school and is 800m away.

Questioning and Experimentation: This segment will investigate the student’s understanding of the subject, questioning capacity, ability to explain and apply and urge for experimentation.

Question 1. Observe A Globe If You Have One In Your Home Or School.

Question 1. Around what does the globe rotate?
Answer: The globe rotates on an imaginary axis.

Question 2. Can you identify the continents and oceans on a globe? Find out where your country is.
Answer: Yes, I can identify the continents and oceans on the globe. Our country India is in the northeastern hemisphere.

Question 3. What are the lines drawn vertically and horizontally in circles around the globe called?
Answer: The lines drawn vertically or in the north-south direction are the meridians of longitude and the lines drawn horizontally or in the east-west direction are the parallels of latitude.

Question 2. Stand on the roof of your house or in the courtyard when the sun rises in the morning and notice the direction in which the houses near your place are located.
Answer: The houses near my house are located in the following directions—

Abdul s house is in the northwest, Rimpa’s house is towards the west, our local club is towards the east, the Kali temple is towards the south and a primary school is located towards the southeast.

Empathy and Cooperation:

This segment will determine the ability of students to work as a team.

Question 1. Make two groups among your friends. One group is ‘globe’, and the other is ‘map’. Now discuss what are the advantages and disadvantages of a globe and a map.
Answer:

Globe is a small model of the Earth, whereas a map is a representation of the Earth on flat paper.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Advantages and disadavantages

 

Aesthetics and Creativity: This segment will check the aesthetic sense and creativity of the students.

Question 1. Draw a layout of your classroom.
Answer:

The layout of my classroom can be illustrated as follows—

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions The layout of my classroom

 

Question 2. There is a beautiful park in front of Rahim and Arka’s homes. Both have drawn pictures of the park.

Question 1. Notice the pictures and find out the similarities and dissimilarities.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions rahim's drawing Arka's drawing

Answer: Similarity:

The main similarity between these two pictures is that location of the elements inside the park is approximately the same in both pictures.

Dissimilarities: The dissimilarities between the drawings are:

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions rahims and arkas drawing

 

Question 2. Find which picture shows us better where this place actually is.
Answer:

Features of the park are more well-sketched in Rahim’s drawing than that Arka’s.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions Surroundings of my shcool

Question 3. Like them try to draw a picture of your home or school and its surroundings.
Answer:

In the sketch, you have made the path from your house to your school. Use signs, symbols and colours such as a playground, park (green colour); ponds (blue colour), and houses (red).

Besides these, for temples, rail stations, and post offices you can use specific signs from the table. Finally, to denote which area is represented by what colour, make an index.

I am Ayushman Jana. I live in the district of East Medinipur. I have drawn a sketch map to depict various physical and cultural features on my way to school, using conventional colours, signs, and symbols and these conventional signs and symbols are shown in an index beside.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps miscellaneous type questions a skecth of the path from my house to school

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth

Chapter 11 Maps Chapter Synopsis

 

1. A map is a diagrammatic representation of the entire Earth’s surface or parts of it, showing the geographical distribution of physical or man-made features on a specific scale.

2. A physical map is an illustration of the physical features like mountains, rivers, forests, etc of the Earth.

3. A political map is the representation of administrative boundaries of countries, states, cities, districts, etc.

4. A map specifically drawn to represent a particular theme (such as weather, population, transport and communication), related to a specific geographic area is known as a thematic map.

5. A globe is a sphere-like small model of the Earth which also helps us to understand how the Earth spins on its axis. The location of any country, continent and waterbody can be very easily spotted on a globe.

6. An Atlas is a collection of maps in the form of a book. In the 16 century, geographer G. Mercator published the first book on maps and named it Atlas’ after the Greek God Atlas.

7. The art and science of map-making are known as Cartography.

8. A map that has two dimensions i.e. length and breadth and is also known as a two-dimensional map. For example, a world map on plain paper is a two-dimensional map.

9. A three-dimensional map has three dimensions i.e., length, breadth and height. It has volume also. For example, globe.

10. A scale of a map is the specific ratio, in which the actual part of the Earth is reduced and shown on a map.

11. Maps which depict a vast area of the world are known as small-scale maps. For example, Atlas, wall map, globe and some topographical maps.

12. Maps which are drawn to depict a small area are known as large scale maps. For example, mouza map, town map, etc.

13. The conventional signs and symbols used in a map are shown in a small box in any one corner of the map. This is known as the index or legend or key.

14. A plan is drawn to precisely depict a small area like a house, a room, etc. It is a type of large scale map.

15. All maps of the world use some standardised colours, signs, symbols and letters to denote universal meanings. These are called conventional signs and symbols.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1. Why are a globe and a map essential components for learning geography?
Answer:

A globe and a map essential components for learning geography:

The reasons why a globe is an essential component for learning geography are as follows—

Occurrence of day and night:

The occurrence of day and night on Earth can be explained better with the help of a globe.

Concept of the Earth’s axis:

The Earth’s axis is tilted at an angle of 661/2° to the orbital plane of the Earth. This concept can be easily understood with the help of a globe.

The reasons why maps are an essential component of learning geography are as follows—

Concept of a region:

The role of maps is most important for gaining a clear idea about a region.

Knowledge about geographical aspects:

We depend on maps in order to collect information like topography, rivers, climate, transportation, population, agriculture, industry, trade, etc of a region.

Determination of direction:

Maps are required to get an idea about the cardinal directions.

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. Discuss the different types of maps.
Answer:

Different types of maps:

Maps can be primarily divided into three categories.

They are as follows—

Physical maps:

Maps depicting several physical features like mountains, plains, plateaus, deserts, rivers, and natural vegetation are called physical maps.

Political maps:

Maps showing countries and states with their boundaries are called political maps.

Thematic maps:

Maps that show specific information on specific themes such as population, roadways, railways, minerals, etc. are called thematic maps.

Question 2. How is the location of any place on the globe determined?
Answer:

The location of any place on the globe determined:

The location of any place on the globe is determined by the help of parallels of latitude and meridians of longitudes.

The point of intersection between parallels and meridians is the exact location of any place.

The imaginary, circular lines running across the surface of the globe in an east-west direction are called lines of latitude. They are parallel to the Equator and to each other.

The semicircular, imaginary lines running from the North Pole to the South Pole and intersecting the Equator at right angles are called lines of longitude.

They are equal in length but hot parallel to each other. The intersection of these imaginary lines of latitude and longitude, known as the geographic grid, allows us to give a mathematical value to the location of any place on the globe.

Question 3. Write a brief note on cartography.
Answer:

Cartography:

The science and art of making maps is known as cartography. It involves the representation of political, cultural, economic and other attributes in a specific geographic area.

The technology used for cartography has been continuously changing. The first maps were hand-painted and lacked accuracy.

The advent of the compass and eventually computers have made maps more accurate and useful.

Question 4. What is the usefulness of a map?
Answer:

Usefulness of a map:

A map is an essential tool that helps us to study geography.

It is used to determine the locations of rivers, mountains and landforms in various cities, countries or continents. Maps influence all our lives.

For example, the location and extension of land boundaries, roadways, rivers, ponds, settlements, and religious establishments can be determined from a cadastral map.

The distance of a particular settlement from the roadways or railways, the nature of a settlement or a forest can also be determined by using a map.

Question 5. Write The Difference Between A Globe And A Map.
Answer:

The difference Between a globe and a map are as follows-

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Globe and maps

 

Question 6. Which is considered to be the most recent era of map making?
Answer:

The most recent era of map making:

From cave paintings to ancient maps of Babylon, Greece and Asia, till the 21 century, people have developed and used maps for various purposes.

In the 15 century, maps were drawn on wooden or copper planks. Maps became increasingly accurate and factual during the 17,18 and 19 centuries with the application of scientific methods.

This is known as the modern era of maps. The world was poorly known until the widespread use of aerial photography following World War-1 Modern cartography is based on a combination of ground observations and remote sensing.

Question 6. Write a short note on the cadastral map.
Answer:

Cadastral map:

Cadastral maps show individual landed property or land registration, that is, the record of ownership of land.

One key feature of a cadastral map is that it carries detailed information about a particular location.

It is an official map that is generally not available for sale. A usual cadastral map in India bears a scale of 16 inches = 1 mile.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. What Is meant by a map?
Answer:

Map:

A map is a diagrammatic representation of the entire Earth’s surface or a section of it, showing the geographical distribution of natural features such as relief, rivers or artificial features such as roads, cities, etc. drawn to a particular scale.

The word ‘map’ is derived from the Latin word ‘mapa’ meaning napkin or cloth. Thus, the map is the two-dimensional representation of our three-dimensional Earth.

Question 2. What is meant by a physical map?
Answer:

Physical map:

A physical map is an illustration of the geographic features of an area depicting the mountains, rivers, forests, etc. Different colours are used for different features—blue for water, green for forest, brown for relief and so on. Examples of physical maps are—

  1. Geological map,
  2. Weather map,
  3. Natural vegetation map, etc.

Question 3. What are the different types of physical maps?
Answer:

There are different types of physical maps. They are—

  1. The physiographic map,
  2. Drainage map,
  3. Relief map,
  4. Weather map,
  5. Natural vegetation map,
  6. Soil map and such others.

Question 4. What is meant by a political map?
Answer:

Political map:

Political maps illustrate the administrative boundaries of countries, states, cities, towns and villages.

They usually do not include physical features, apart from important waterbodies that help us to determine locations.

Different colours are used to denote different administrative areas. Locations of cities both large and small are depicted depending on the scale of the map. A capital city is generally marked within a circle.

Question 5. What is a thematic map?
Answer:

Thematic map:

A map is especially drawn to show a particular theme related to a specific geographic area known as a thematic map.

These maps usually portray the physical, social, economic, and sociological details of a city, state, region, country or continent.

Examples of thematic maps are maps showing roadways, railways, distribution of minerals, etc.

Question 6. How did the word exist?
Answer:

Word MAP exist:

The word ‘map’ is derived from the Latin word ‘mapa’ meaning napkin or cloth. The reason is that in ancient times, maps were drawn on cloth, leather and similar other articles.

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. We can see the presence of mountains, plateaus and plains on a—

  1. Relief map
  2. Geological map
  3. Political map

Answer: 1. Relief map

Question 2. The weather map is a—

  1. Physical map
  2. Political map
  3. Thematic map

Answer: 3. Thematic map

Question 3. The oldest map known was discovered in—

  1. India
  2. Babylon
  3. Greece

Answer: 2. Babylon

Question 4. The oldest map known is from years ago before the birth of Jesus.

  1. 2000
  2. 2500
  3. 3000

Answer: 2. 2500

Question 5. The oldest map known was drawn on tablets made of—

  1. Terracotta
  2. Sandstone
  3. Limestone

Answer: 1. Terracotta

Question 6. The first atlas was published in the—

  1. 15 Century
  2. 16 Century
  3. 12 Century

Answer: 2. 16 Century

Question 7. Atlas is a—

  1. Greek god
  2. Roman god
  3. Egyptian god

Answer: 1. Greek god

Question 8. The word ‘map’ is derived from the word ‘mapa’.

  1. Greek
  2. Latin
  3. Sanskrit

Answer: 2. Latin

Question 9. The science and art of making maps is known as—

  1. Cartography
  2. Photography
  3. Topography

Answer: 1. Cartography

Question 10. In which part of Asia is India located?

  1. Southern part
  2. Northern part
  3. Eastern part

Answer: 1. Southern part

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Fill In the Blanks

Question 1. The features of the Earth’s surface, when depicted on paper drawn to a particular scale, are known as__________________
Answer: Map

Question 2. Mineral resource distribution map is a type of__________________ map.
Answer: Thematic

Question 3. Collection of maps in a form of a book is known as__________________
Answer: Atlas

Question 4. __________________is the art of map-making.
Answer: Cartography

Question 5. Nowadays maps are generated from satellite imageries through__________________
Answer: Computers

Question 6. inch mile= __________________is the scale of a cadastral map.
Answer: 1

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Write True Or False

Question 1. A small model of the Earth is known as a globe.
Answer: True

Question 2. Commercial maps depict mountains and hills.
Answer: False

Question 3. A book of maps is known as an Atlas.
Answer: True

Question 4. The thematic map always shows the density of any geographical data.
Answer: False

Question 5. The true depiction of the Earth can be found on a globe.
Answer: False

Question 6. Maps can be produced from satellite images with the help of computers.
Answer: True

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Match The Columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth match the following
Answer: 1-D,2-C,3-A,4-B

 

Chapter 11 Maps Topic A Accurate Representation Of The Earth Answer In One Or Two Words

Question 1. What kind of a map is an environmental map?
Answer: Thematic map.

Question 2. Where was the oldest known map discovered?
Answer: Babylon.

Question 3. Which Greek God’s name was used to name the first book of maps?
Answer: Atlas.

Question 4. What is the art of making maps called?
Answer: Cartography.

Question 5. What does the globe rotate on?
Answer: Axis.

Question 6. Name the globe’s axial movement.
Answer: Rotation.

Question 7. Name the lines running north-south on a globe.
Answer: Meridians of Longitude.

Question 8. Name the lines running east-west on a globe.
Answer: Parallels of Latitude.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Map Pointing

Question 1.

Answer: 

  1. Tropical Humid Climatic region
  2.  Dry Climatic region
  3. Semi-Arid Climatic region
  4. Tropical Savana
  5. Climatic region
  6. Mountain
  7. Climatic region
  8. Wet Tropical Climatic region

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Map pointing 1

Question 2.

Answer: 

  1. Kanchenjunga
  2. Coromandel Coast
  3. River Ganga
  4. Wet Tropical Climatic region
  5. A region with mountain soil
  6. Tropic of Cancer
  7. Gulf of Khambat
  8. A Bengali language-speaking region
  9. Northern Circars
  10. Indira Point
  11. River Luni
  12. Aravalli Range
  13. Arabian Sea
  14. Nepal
  15. Vindhya Range

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Map pointing .2

Question 3.

Answer: 

  1. Mount Everest
  2. Konkan Coast
  3. River Kaveri
  4. Northern Plains
  5. Mangrove vegetation
  6. Satpura Range
  7. Largest mangrove forest
  8. Malabar Coast
  9. Sri Lanka
  10. Delhi (The capital of India)
  11. Gulf of Mannar
  12. Palk Strait
  13. Chilka Lake
  14. Kathiawar Peninsula
  15. Garo Hills

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Map pointing 3

Question 4. 

Answer: 

  1. Pirpanjal Range
  2. Siwalik Range
  3. Karakoram Range
  4. Western Ghats
  5. Godwin Austin
  6. Rann of Kachchh
  7. Thar Desert
  8. Meghalaya Plateau
  9. Andaman and Nicobar Islands
  10. East Coast of India
  11. Black Soil region
  12. Tea Producing region of India
  13. Jute producing region
  14. Paddy producing region
  15. Peninsular Plateau region of the Deccan Plateau
  16. Eastern Ghats

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Map pointing 4

Question 5. 

Answer: 

  1. River Krishna
  2. River Narmada
  3. River Godavari
  4. River Mahanadi
  5. River Brahmaputra
  6. Mumbai
  7. Kolkata
  8. Bengaluru
  9. Mawsynram
  10. Srinagar
  11. Bhubaneswar
  12. Desert soil region
  13. Kaziranga National Park
  14. A National Park
  15. Black soil region

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Map pointing 5

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Analytical Questions

 

Question 1. What is Green Revolution? Or, What are the changes and impacts t associated with Green Revolution?
Answer:

Green Revolution:

The Green Revolution is a series of research and technological developments that were applied to agriculture and which then resulted in a significant increase in agricultural production. It began in India in the 1960s.

The type of changes and impacts associated with the Green Revolution are as follows—

1. Biochemical innovations: This involved a selection of hybrid seeds, the use of fertilisers, herbicides and pesticides.

Consequently, there was a drastic increase in the yield of crops. Pests and weeds were also under control.

2. Mechanical innovations: Irrigation facilities using electric and petrol pumps were introduced under the Green Revolution. Improved transportation was also brought into use.

As a consequence, access to water supply surpassed the sole dependence on rainfall, an extension of arable land was noticed, less labour was needed and there was increased access to markets.

3. Social innovations: With the Green Revolution, there was a huge enhancement in the distributive system, loan systems and also in land reforms. Farms were consolidated. Better quality seeds and other inputs were made available to farmers.

Question 2. What is the physical environment favourable for paddy cultivation Name four states which produce paddy
Answer:

Physical environment favourable for paddy cultivation:

Paddy is the main crop of the tropical climatic conditions suitable for cultivation of paddy in

India are as follows—

1. Climate: The two major elements of climate that affect paddy cultivation are temperature and rainfall.

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing paddy ranges from 22°C to 32°C. But paddy can also grow at temperatures ranging from 16°C-27°C.

Rainfall: Paddy is a thirsty crop. Abundant water is required for paddy to grow, but, at the same time, during the harvest, there should be bright sunshine. The average annual rainfall required for growing paddy ranges between 150 and cm-300 cm.

2. Soil: The best soil for growing paddy is loamy alluvial soil. The slope of the land should be such that during the growing season, there should be standing water on the field.

3. Irrigation: Paddy requires an ample amount of rainfall. In the absence of rainfall proper irrigation facilities should be maintained.

4. Labour: Paddy is a labour-intensive crop. Planting seeds, harvesting, and fertilising all require manual labour.

Cultivating states: West Bengal, Assam, Tamil Nadu and Uttar Pradesh are four of the many paddy-growing states in India. West Bengal tops the list of growing paddy in India.

Question 3. What are the favourable climatic conditions for growing wheat in India? Name four states of India that produce wheat.
Answer:

The favourable climatic conditions for the cultivation of wheat in India are as follows—

Climate: The two major elements of climate that affect wheat cultivation are temperature, rainfall and frost-free days.

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing wheat ranges from 15°C to 20°C. Wheat is generally cultivated during winter in India.

Rainfall: The average rainfall required for growing wheat ranges from 50 cm to 100 cm.

Frost-free days: A minimum of 110 frost-free days are required for the successful cultivation of wheat.

Soil: The best soil for growing wheat is lime-rich loamy soil.

Landforms: Flat or rolling plain land with an improved drainage system is required for the cultivation of wheat.

Cultivating states: Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Bihar and Punjab are the leading states in producing wheat in India.

Question 4. Discuss the favourable climatic conditions for cultivating millets (jowar, bajra and ragi) in India and name the millet-growing regions.
Answer:

The favourable climatic conditions for the cultivation of millets and the states growing millets in India are—

1. Jowar:

Climate: The average annual temperature required for growing jowar ranges from 27°C- 32°C and the average annual rainfall required for growing jowar ranges from 30 cm-100 cm.

Soil: Sandy soil and sandy-loamy soil.

Cultivating States: Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and others.

2. Bajra:

Climate: The average annual temperature required for growing bajra ranges from 25°C-28°C and the average annual rainfall required for growing bajra ranges from 40 cm-50 cm.

Soil: Sandy soil and sandy-loamy soil.

Cultivating States: Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Haryana, Maharashtra and others.

3. Ragi:

Climate: The average annual temperature required for growing ragi ranges from 27°C-32°C and the average annual rainfall required for growing ragi ranges from 35 cm-60 cm.

Soil: Sandy soil and sandy-loamy soil.

Cultivating States: Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Bihar and others.

Question 5. Discuss the favourable climatic conditions and the regions for lentil cultivation.
Answer:

The climatic conditions suitable for the cultivation of lentils and the states growing lentils in India are as follows—

1. Climate:

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing lentils ranges from 20°C-30°C.

Rainfall: The annual average rainfall required for growing lentils ranges from 50 cm to 75 cm.

Soil: The best soils for growing lentils are loamy soil and black soil.

Cultivating states: Most states of India cultivate lentils, but Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and West Bengal are at the top of the list.

Question 6. Discuss the climatic conditions suitable for cultivating sugarcane in India and name the sugarcane-growing regions.
Answer:

The climatic conditions suitable for the cultivation of sugarcane and the states growing sugarcane in India are as follows—

Climate:

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing sugarcane ranges from 25°C to 30°C.

Rainfall: The average annual rainfall required for growing sugarcane ranges from 100 cm to 150 cm.

Soil: The best soil for growing sugarcane is loamy soil rich in nitrogen and potash with an improved drainage system.

Cultivating states: Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Punjab, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh top the list.

Question 7. Discuss the Favourable climate conditions for cultivating jute in India and name the jute-growing regions.
Answer:

The favourable climatic conditions for the cultivation of jute and the jute-growing states in India are as follows—

Climate:

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing jute ranges from 28°C to 36°C.

Rainfall: The average annual rainfall required for growing jute ranges from 150 cm to 200 cm.

Soil: The best soils for growing jute are clayey alluvial soil and loamy soil.

Cultivating states: West Bengal, Bihar and Odisha top the list.

Question 8. Discuss the favourable climatic  Conditions for cultivating, cotton in India and name the cotton-growing
Answer:

The favourable climatic conditions for the cultivation of cotton and the states growing cotton in India are as follows—

Climate:

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing cotton ranges from 20°C to 35°C.

Rainfall: The average annual rainfall required for growing cotton ranges from 50 cm to 100 cm.

Soil: The best soil for growing cotton is well-drained phosphate and lime-rich black soil.

Cultivating states: Maharashtra, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Punjab and Haryana are the major cotton-growing states.

Question 9. Discuss conditions for cultivating tea in India
Answer:

The favourable climatic conditions for the cultivation of tea and the states growing tea in India are as follows—

Climate:

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing tea ranges from 20°C to 30°C.

Rainfall: The average annual rainfall required for growing tea ranges from 150 cm to 200 cm.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India tea cultivation

Soil: Humus-rich loamy soil with high water holding capacity on a slopy land is the best soil for growing tea.

Cultivating states: Assam, West Bengal, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu grow the most amount of tea that India produces.

Question 10. Discuss the favourable climatic conditions for cultivating coffee in India and name the coffee-growing regions.
Answer:

The favourable climatic conditions for the cultivation of coffee and the states growing coffee in India are as follows—

Climate:

Temperature: The average annual temperature required for growing coffee ranges from 18°C to 28°C.

Rainfall: The average annual rainfall I required for growing coffee ranges from 150 cm to 200 cm.

Soil: The soil required for growing coffee should be rich in iron, potash, nitrogen and humus. Sloppy land with an improved drainage system also helps in coffee cultivation.

Cultivating states: Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu contribute the most to the production of coffee in India.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Short Analytical Questions

Question 1. What are the main features of Indian agriculture?
Answer:

The main characteristics of Indian agriculture are as follows—

Great dependence on monsoons and low to moderate availability of irrigation facilities throughout the country.

The fluctuations and inequality in crop production are dependent on climatic factors, soils and variations in physiography.

More dependence on food crops along with reliance on age-old agricultural practices.

Question 2. Write a short note on shifting cultivation.
Answer:

Shifting cultivation:

Shifting cultivation is a type of subsistence farming. Almost 85% of the cultivation that takes place in the northeastern states of India is of this type.

In shifting cultivation, the existing vegetation on land is cut and burnt down and then the stretch of land is cultivated for a few years unless the yield of the crop reduces, the fertility of the soil is exhausted and the field is affected by pests and weeds.

As the crop yield reduces, the land is deserted to allow it to regain its fertility.

The length of time for which the land is cultivated is always shorter than the length of time for which the land remains fallow.

Shifting cultivation is also known as Jhum cultivation and the people practising it are known as Jhumia.

Question 3. What are the harmful effects caused by jhum cultivation on the environment?
Answer:

The harmful effects caused by jhum cultivation on the environment are hereafter—

  1. Clearing of forested lands leads to increased pollution.
  2. Air pollution is caused by the burning down of forests.
  3. An increase in soil erosion due to the absence of trees leads to sedimentation of the nearby rivers.
  4. The ecological balance of the place is disturbed.
  5. Various plant and animal species die because of the burning of forests. Many species even face extinction.

Question 4. What steps are taken to enhance the fertility of agricultural land?
Answer:

The steps taken to enhance the fertility of agricultural land are as follows—

  1. Regular application of natural (cow dung) and artificial (urea and potash) fertilisers on agricultural land.
  2. Improved agricultural practices such as multiple cropping should be encouraged.
  3. Reduction in the use of excessive amounts of pesticides on the crops.
  4. Reduction in the dependence on rainfall and more usage of irrigation facilities.
  5. Use of HYV seeds of modern and mechanised agricultural implements.

Question 5. Which places in India are popular for paddy cultivation?
Answer:

Places in India are popular for paddy cultivation:

India has the largest paddy output in the world. West Bengal holds first place in paddy production.

Apart from this, paddy is cultivated along the entire eastern and western coastal plains, the Himalayan foothill regions and also the Gangetic Plain regions.

Bihar, Assam, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh etc are the other important rice-growing states of India.

Question 6. Which places in India are popular for wheat cultivation?
Answer:

The northern regions in India have always been prominent in the cultivation of wheat. They can be subdivided into the following-

Northern Hill Zone: Hilly areas of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand, Sikkim.

North-Western Plain Zone: Parts of Punjab, Haryana, western Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Delhi, Uttarakhand, and Chandigarh.

North-Eastern Plain Zone: Parts of eastern Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, West Bengal, Assam, Odisha and the north-eastern states.

Central Zone: Parts of Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Chattisgarh, Rajasthan

Peninsular Zone: Parts of Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh.

Southern Hill Zone: Parts of Tamil Nadu.

Question 7. Cotton, jute and tea are cash crops/ —Why?
Answer:

Cotton, jute and tea are cash crops:

Beautiful and fancy clothes made out of cotton and jute are mostly used for industrial purposes. Tea earns a huge amount of foreign currency.

Jute, cotton and tea along with the end-products made from them have great market value, not only in native markets but also abroad.

All these are important products for export and import. Thus cotton, jute and tea are known to be cash crops.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. Why is India known as an agro-based country?
Answer:

India known as an agro-based country:

A large section of the Indian population is directly or indirectly dependent on agriculture. A prominent percentage of the national income is based on agriculture.

All developmental planning in India is done on the basis of the amount of productivity and the nature of agriculture.

In India, 54% of the land area is used for agriculture. Thus India is knowns as an agro-based country.

Question 2. Why Is irrigation necessary for agriculture?
Answer:

Irrigation necessary for agriculture:

The use of water is indispensable for agriculture. Before irrigation facilities were available, agriculture was absolutely dependent on rainfall.

Rainfall, being a natural phenomenon, is sometimes irregular. So canal, well and tank irrigation were brought into use.

The crops receive a timely and adequate amount of water through irrigation. For instance, in winter, wheat needs a lot of water and this is supplied through irrigation.

Question 3. What is meant by food crop?
Answer:

Food crop:

Crops that are cultivated mainly for human consumption are known as food crops. The common food crops in India are rice, wheat, millet, maize, etc.

Question 4. What is meant by cash crop?
Answer:

Cash crop:

Crops that are grown for their commercial value rather than for consumption are known as cash crops. The common cash crops in India are jute, sugarcane, cotton and oilseeds.

Question 5. What is meant by rabi crop?
Answer:

Rabi crop:

The word ‘rabi’ comes from the Arabic word for spring. Rabi crops also known as winter crops – are sown in winter and harvested in spring. The common rabi crops are wheat, gram and mustard.

Question 6. Mention the sowing and harvesting seasons of rabi crops.
Answer:

The sowing and harvesting seasons of rabi crops

Rabi crops are also known as winter crops. They are sown in the months of October- November and harvested in the months of March-April.

Question 7. What is meant by the Kharif crop?
Answer:

Kharif crop:

The word ‘kharif’ comes from the Arabic word for autumn. Kharif crops also known as monsoon crops are sown with the advent of monsoon in south-eastern Asia.

They are harvested in autumn that is, around October. The common kharif crops are rice, millet and maize.

Question 8. Mention the sowing and harvesting seasons for Kharif crops.
Answer:

The sowing and harvesting seasons for Kharif crops:

Kharif crops are also known as monsoon crops. They are sown in the months of June-July and harvested in the months of September- October.

Question 9. What is meant by zaid crop?
Answer:

zaid crop:

The crops that are sown in February/ March and harvested in May/June are known as zaid crops.

These crops are grown in the time period between Kharif and rabbi crops. For example, vegetables of the cucurbit family (pointed gourd, bottle gourd, cucumber, etc.)

Question 10. Name the types of crops grown in India. Give examples.
Answer:

The types of crops grown in India are—

Food crops: paddy, wheat, millet

Vegetable crops: potato, brinjal, narwhal

Beverage crops: tea, coffee

Fibrous crops: cotton, jute

Other crops: lentils, oil seeds, rubber.

Question 11. What is meant by terrace cultivation? Or, What is meant by step cultivation?
Answer:

Terrace cultivation:

The method of cultivation that involves growing crops on a graduated terrace or step-cut surfaces, built along a hill slope is known as terrace cultivation or step cultivation.

This type of cultivation reduces soil erosion and surface run-off but is labour-intensive. It is an environment-friendly way of cultivation.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India terrace cultivation

Question 12. Which soil is best for cotton cultivation?
Answer:

Cotton grows best in silty and clayey soils- both of which contain sand.

In India, the highest concentration of cotton cultivation is seen in the Deccan Plateau region which is overlaid by black soil, popularly known as black cotton soil.

This soil is black in colour due to the presence of compounds of iron and aluminium and organic matter content.

Question 13. What is meant by subsistence farming?
Answer:

Subsistence farming:

Subsistence farming, also known as self-sufficiency farming, is mainly done to maintain the needs of the farmer and his family. Very little or no surplus exists for trading purposes.

This type of farming is done with barely any modern equipment and it includes both crop yielding and raising of animals.

The yield per unit of land is high and is mainly practised in countries with high population density.

Question 14. What is meant by extensive farming?
Answer:

Extensive farming:

Extensive farming is carried out in places with sparse populations, especially in countries with a lower density of population.

This type of farming involves less capital and labour as compared to the area being farmed but involves extensive use of technology.

Both crop cultivation and animal rearing can be done under extensive farming and the yield per unit of land is low.

Question 15. Why is jute called the ‘golden fibre’?
Answer:

Golden fibre:

Jute is a fibre crop. This is the only natural fibre that bears an original golden colour.

Thus un-dyed jute can be used for making several fancy products that are sold in the market at high prices.

So, the natural golden colour and high market price earned jute the name of the ‘golden fibre’.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. The people in India are involved with agriculture.

  1. 50%
  2. 65%
  3. 90%

Answer: 2. 65%

Question 2. Is an example of a Kharif crop.

  1. Jute
  2. Mustard
  3. Potato

Answer: 1. Jute

Question 3. This crop is an example of a rabi crop—

  1. Jute
  2. Mustard
  3. Paddy

Answer: 2. Mustard

Question 4. This is an example of a fibrous crop—

  1. Potato
  2. Cotton
  3. Millet

Answer: 2. Cotton

Question 5. This crop is said to be the ‘golden fibre’—

  1. Jute
  2. Paddy
  3. Cotton

Answer: 1. Jute

Question 6. The highest producer of paddy in West Bengal is—

  1. Hooghly
  2. South 24 Parganas
  3. Burdwan

Answer: 3. Burdwan

Question 7. The green revolution resulted in a big change in the yield of—

  1. Paddy
  2. Wheat
  3. Jute

Answer: 2. Wheat

Question 8. The green revolution happened in the decade of—

  1. 1960S
  2. 1980S
  3. 1950S

Answer: 1. the 1960S

Question 9. India’s premier Institute of wheat research is located in—

  1. Pusa, Delhi
  2. Cuttack, Odisha
  3. Karnai, Haryana

Answer: 3. Karnai, Haryana

Question 10. Millets are a kind of grass.

  1. Large-seeded
  2. Small-seeded
  3. Medium-seeded

Answer: 2. Small-seeded

Question 11. The highest producer of jute in India is—

  1. West Bengal
  2. Bihar
  3. Assam

Answer: 1. West Bengal

Question 12. This state is known to be the ‘rice bowl of India’—

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Karnataka
  3. Tamil Nadu

Answer: 1. Andhra Pradesh

Question 13. Is most famous for its flavoured tea.

  1. Darjeeling
  2. Assam
  3. Nilgiri

Answer: 1. Darjeeling

Question 14. The highest producer of wheat in India is—

  1. Uttar Pradesh
  2. Punjab
  3. Haryana

Answer: 1. Uttar Pradesh

Question 15. Is a high-yielding variety of wheat seed.

  1. Sonalika
  2. Ratna
  3. Kasturi

Answer: 1. Sonalika

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Fill In The Blanks

Question 1. Sugarcane is a_____________ crop.
Answer: Cash

Question 2. Apart from tea,_____________ is also an example of a beverage crop.
Answer: Coffee

Question 3. _____________involves clearing the existing forest cover and burning it down before cropping.
Answer: Jhum Cultivation

Question 4. _____________ are used to control pests from damaging agricultural crops.
Answer: Pesticides

Question 5. _____________ are used to enhance the productivity of agricultural lands.
Answer: Fertilisers

Question 6. _____________ is required during the dry seasons to enhance crop production.
Answer: Irrigation

Question 7. _____________is known as the ‘Staple food of India’
Answer: Rice

Question 8. The success of the ‘Green Revolution in India has escalated the production of _____________
Answer: Wheat

Question 9. The southern state of_____________ is the highest producer of coffee in India
Answer: Karnataka

Question 10. The Central Institute for Cotton Research is located in _____________
Answer: Nagpur

Question 11. _____________ Central Research Institute for Jute and Allied Fibres is situated in Barrackpore, West Bengal is a premier institute to study
Answer: Jute

Question 12. _____________ soil is best for the cultivation of paddy.
Answer: Alluvial

Question 13. _____________ is the ‘Rice bowl of West Bengal’.
Answer: Burdwan

Question 14. _____________ and are the kinds of coffee that are cultivated more in India
Answer: Arabica, Robusta.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Write True Or False

Question 1. Jowar is known as ‘kolam’ in Tamil.
Answer: True

Question 2. The Green Revolution took place during the first 5-year plan.
Answer: False

Question 3. India is the highest producer of jute in the world.
Answer: True

Question 4. Regur soil is the best for the cultivation of jute in India.
Answer: False

Question 5. Gujarat ranks first in the production of cotton in India.
Answer: True

Question 6. Tamil Nadu grows the highest density of sugarcane per hectare in India.
Answer: True

Question 7. Central Research Institute for Jute and Allied Fibres is in Bangalore, Karnataka.
Answer: False

Question 8. Coconut belongs to the palm family.
Answer: True

Question 9. Andhra Pradesh ranks first in the production of groundnut in India.
Answer: False

Question 10. Karnataka accounts for the highest contribution to coffee production in India.
Answer: True

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Match The Columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India match the columns
Answer: 1-E, 2-G,3-B,4-F, 5-D,6-C,7-A

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic G Agriculture Of India Answer In Or Two Words

Question 1. What are the crops that are sown in winter and harvested in spring known as?
Answer: Rabi crops.

Question 2. Which crop is cultivated with the onset of monsoon?
Answer: Kharif crop.

Question 3. Which region in India is famous for Jhum Cultivation?
Answer: The hilly regions of north-eastern India.

Question 4. Name the season in which orange grows the best.
Answer: Winter.

Question 5. Name the coarsest millet.
Answer: Ragi.

Question 6. What type of crop is millet?
Answer: Cereal crop.

Question 7. Which state ranks first in the production of sugarcane in India?
Answer: Uttar Pradesh.

Question 8. Which crop grows best on hill slopes?
Answer: Tea.

Question 9. Which state ranks first in the production of paddy in India?
Answer: West Bengal.

Question 10. Name the wind that influences the agriculture of our country the most.
Answer: Monsoon winds.

Question 11. Which season is mostly associated with the cultivation of wheat?
Answer: Winter.

Question 12. Which soil is best for cotton cultivation?
Answer: Phosphate and lime-rich Black soil.

Question 13. Which soil is best for paddy cultivation?
Answer: Loamy alluvial soil.

Question 14. Which soil is best for wheat cultivation?
Answer: Lime-rich loamy soil.

Question 15. Which climate is best for paddy cultivation?
Answer: Monsoon.

Question 16. Name the alternative beverage crop for tea.
Answer: Coffee.

Question 17. Name a winter vegetable.
Answer: Cauliflower.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1. Write about the various primitive tribes of India
Answer:

The various primitive tribes of India:

Information related to various primitive tribes of India is given below in a table format.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Tribes

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Tribes states and features

 

Question 2. Write the languages spoken by the people of different states and union territories in different parts of the country.
Answer:

The languages spoken by the people of different states and union territories in different parts of the country:

On the basis of the languages spoken in the different regions all the states of India were reorganised and on 1 November 1956 the State Re-organisation Act came into action.

The main aim behind this was to preserve and promote the national unity and diversity of various cultures. Since then, several states have formed over the years on the basis of languages spoken

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Languages

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. Write a short note about the Santhal tribe.
Answer:

Santhal tribe:

The Santhals are the third largest tribal group in India. Santhals are mainly found in West Bengal, Jharkhand, Odisha and Bihar.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Santhal tride.

 

Characteristics: Santhals have strong bodies, curly hair, thick lips and a wide nose. They mainly speak the Santhali language. The 01 Chiki is the Santhali writing system.

The Santhals are animists. The name of the Santhals’ own religion is Sarna. Their chief god is Maran Burn. Santhals are mainly farmers.

However, many work as labourers in factories or on land. Santhals have 12 clans, each of which has its own totem. Santhals are widely known for the Santhal rebellion in 1855.

Question 2. Write a brief note on the Kinnaur tribe.
Answer:

Kinnaur tribe:

Kinnaurs are the native people of Himachal Pradesh.

Characteristics: The local people communicate in Kinnauri, a local dialect. English and Hindi are also understood and spoken by people associated with tourism.

The music and dance of Kinnaur are very famous all over the country. The dresses of Kinnaur are also popular. The people are mainly followers of Buddhism and Hinduism.

The traditional occupation of the Kinnaur tribe is animal herding. Though this traditional profession has now been changed from shepherd to horticulture, and agriculture.

The bulky silver ornaments are displayed by the women of Kinnaur. The staple food is wheat.

Question 3. Write a short note on the Gond tribe.
Answer:

Gond tribe:

The Gonds are the largest tribal community in India. In the states of Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh and Andhra Pradesh, people of the Gond tribal group live.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Gond tribe

 

Characteristics: Gond people speak the Gondi language. They possess a strong body, black complexion, brown eyes and a wide nose. They have their own religion and own habitat.

The houses are generally earthen and there is no decoration on the wall. Agriculture is the main livelihood of Gonds but many still live by hunting.

Gonds have now learned the method of sedentary agriculture. Every Gond village has its own governing pattern, which is based on democracy. Millets are the main food grains of the Gonds.

Question 4. Write a brief note on the Bhil tribe.
Answer:

Bhil tribe:

The Bhils constitute the second largest tribal group in India. The concentration of Bhils in the country is found in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan and Maharastra.

Characteristics: Bhil people mainly speak the Bhili language. The Bhils are generally mountain-dwellers. Maize is the staple food of the Bhils. By traditions, Bhils are non-vegetarians.

The favourite weapons of a Bhil are his bows and arrows. In past, the Bhils used to gather forest products.

Now subsistent agriculture is the main livelihood of the Bhils. Mango and Pipal trees are the most sacred trees among the Bhils. These trees are worshipped as gods.

Question 5. Write a brief note on the Chenchu tribe.
Answer:

Chenchu tribe:

The Chenchus are the tribal community of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Chenchu tribe.

 

Characteristics: The Chenchus speak the Chenchu language. Their traditional profession is based on hunting and gathering. Chenchus are still primitive tribal groups, living in Nallamala forests, hunting for a livelihood.

They do not practise agriculture. They use a bow and arrow for hunting. Apart from maize, roots, tubers and fruits, Chenchuslovetoeatfresh honey.

Chenchus have short stature with long heads and good eyebrows. They are mainly followers of Hinduism. Chenchu village, known as Penta, consists of a few huts based on kinship patterns.

Question 6. Write a brief note on the Toda tribe.
Answer:

Toda tribe:

The Toda tribe lives in the Nilgiri mountains in Tamil Nadu.

Characteristics: Their main occupation is animal rearing. They produce dairy products like butter, ghee, and paneer and sell these products in the local market.

The people of this tribe are mainly vegetarian and their main food is milk and vegetables. They live in small hamlets called Munds. The front portion of the hut is decorated with Toda art forms.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Toda tribe

 

Question 7. Write a brief note on Garo and Khasi tribes,
Answer:

Garo And Khasi tribes:

The Garo and Khasi tribes live in the dense forests of the northeastern state of Meghalaya. The Khasis are the largest and the Garos are the second-largest tribal population of the state.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Khasi and garo tribe

 

Characteristics: Both tribes follow a matrilineal society. They use branches, the bark of trees, bamboo and wooden pillars, to construct their houses.

The chief occupations of these tribes are animal rearing as well as Jhum cultivation. They also make fancy items out of bamboo and cane which they sell in the market.

They mainly grow paddy, potato, pineapple, orange, chilly, onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric and so on for consumption as well as trade.

Question 8. Write a short note on the Jarawa, Onge, and Sentinelese tribes of Andaman.
Answer:

Jarawa, Onge, and Sentinelese tribes of Andaman:

Jarawa tribe is found in the dense forests of Andaman. The Jarawas are known to be very fierce hunters. Hunting-gathering is the chief occupation of this tribe.

The Onge tribe inhabit Little Andaman. A major cause of the decline of this tribe is the changing food habits brought about by contact with the outside world. The Onge people are one of the least fertile people in the world.

The Sentinelese people live on the North Sentinel Island in the Andamans. Unlike other tribes, Sentinelese people have consistently refused any interaction with the outside world.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India jarawa and onge tribe

 

Question 9. Why do so many people from so many different states live in Mumbai?
Answer:

A huge number of people from different states live in Mumbai because—

Mumbai is the economic capital of India. So, there are more jobs and more opportunities to carry out businesses there.

Mumbai is the main centre of the Indian film industry-the largest in the world providing thousands of people with job opportunities.

Mumbai also has the largest port in India.

Question 10. Write a brief note on 15 August.
Answer:

15 August:

15th August is celebrated as the Independence Day of India. India became independent after almost 200 years of British rule at midnight on 14th August 1947 and gained the status of a sovereign nation.

On this day, the British Governor General, Lord Mountbatten handed over the administrative reigns of the country to Jawaharlal Nehru who then became the first Prime Minister of independent India.

Question 11. Write a brief note on 26 January
Answer:

26 January:

6 January is celebrated as Republic Day in India. ‘Republic’ means a state in which power is held by the people and that power is exercised by the representatives elected by them.

The constitution of India was adopted on 26 November 1949 and came into effect on 26 January 1950.

When we celebrate Republic Day, we take a pledge as independent Indian citizens to express our national consciousness and carry out the responsibilities of a good citizen.

Question 12. India is known as a secular country Explain why.
Answer:

India is known as a secular country:

India is home to Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Jains, Buddhists and Christians. According to the Indian Constitution, people of all religions are equal and have equal fundamental rights in the eyes of the law.

There is no discrimination or preference on the basis of religion. Thus, India is a secular country.

Question 13. Briefly describe one of the main festivals of the people of West Bengal.
Answer:

Main festivals of the people of West Bengal:

Durga Puja is one of the main festivals of the people of West Bengal.

According to the “Markandeya Purana”, when the demon Mahisashura’s cruelty became unbearable, goddess Durga came into being from the collective powers of the gods to vanquish Mahishasura.

During Durga Puja, Durga’s sons and daughters Laxmi, Saraswati, Kartikeya and Ganesha are also worshipped. This five-day-long festival is celebrated by wearing new clothes and giving gifts.

Question 14. Briefly describe Eld.
Answer:

Eld:

Eid is a festival of joy. Each lunar year is followed by two Eid festivals—Eid-ul-Zaha (Bakr -Eid) and Eid-ul-Fitr. Muslims observe fasts (Roja) for one month (Ramazan) before Eid-ul-Fitr.

At the end of the Ramzan month, when the new moon is sighted, the next day is celebrated as Eid. During Eid, Muslims abstain from vices or indulgences of any sort and their prayers to Allah are those of thankfulness.

Question 15. Write a brief note on Muharram.
Answer:

Muharram:

Muharram is an important and holy month in the Islamic calendar. The Shia community marks it as a month of mourning to commemorate the death of the Prophet’s grandson Hussein.

The then Caliph killed Hussein by attacking him on the banks of the Euphrates. He fought with the Caliph for ten days and finally died on the tenth day.

So, Muharram is commemorated on the 10th day of the Muharram month in remembrance of Hussein.

Question 16. Discuss the festival of Christmas.
Answer:

The festival of Christmas:

People from all over the world celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ on Christmas Day or Christmas. This is the main festival of Christians.

2000 years ago Jesus Christ was born in the city of Bethlehem on this day and preached the lessons of love and friendship among the people.

Every year on 25 December, Christians celebrate Christmas by giving alms, and gifts, cutting cakes and lighting candles in thankfulness.

Question 17. Write a short note on Diwali.
Answer:

Diwali:

Diwali is the festival of lights. It is a Hindu festival that is celebrated every year at the end of autumn. Temples, houses and cities are decorated with earthen lamps (diya).

People worship Goddess Kali in the eastern parts of the country and in north India, the Goddess Laxmi is worshipped. This festival symbolises the elimination of the forces of darkness with light.

Question 18. Write a brief note on Holi.
Answer:

Holi:

Holi is the festival of colours. It is celebrated at the end of winter and the onset of spring. So, it is also known as Vasanta Utsav.

Vasant means spring in most Indian languages of Sanskrit origin. People play with colours. Holi is specially celebrated in Vrindavan, Mathura of Uttar Pradesh, Shantiniketan, Nabadip, Shantipur, and Mayapur of West Bengal.

Holika Dahan is a ritual associated with this festival on the night before symbolising the triumph of good over evil.

Question 19. Write a brief note on Good Friday.
Answer:

Holi:

Good Friday is the Friday on which Christians the world over commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

It is observed as a day of sorrow. It is followed by Easter Sunday which is celebrated as the day of Jesus’s resurrection.

Thus, the name Good Friday since is followed by Easter celebrating his victory over death and sin.

Question 20. Write a note on Mahavira Jayanti.
Answer:

Mahavira Jayanti:

Mahavira’s birthday is celebrated as Mahavir Jayanti. Mahavira was born in Vaishali, North Bihar. He was the son of King Siddhartha and Queen Trishala.

After intense meditation for a period of 12 years, he attained enlightenment and became the ‘Mahavira’.

The five vows of Jainism introduced by him are—

  1. Ahimsa or non-violence,
  2. Satya or truth,
  3. Asteya or non-greediness,
  4. Brahmacharya or celibacy
  5. Aparigraha or non-possessiveness.

Question 21. Write a note on Buddha Purnima.
Answer:

Buddha Purnima:

Buddha’s birth anniversary is celebrated as Buddha Purnima. It is celebrated with great fervour all across the world.

It falls on a full moon day and in the month of Vaisakh according to the Hindu calendar.

It is observed as the day of Buddha’s birth, the attainment of Nirvana under the Mahabodhi tree at Bodh Gaya, as well as his death anniversary.

Devotees of Buddha visit temples, light incense sticks and candles and offer fruits and sweets to the statue of Lord Buddha.

Several Buddhists also visit the pagodas to pour water at the foot of the sacred tree in remembrance of Buddha’s enlightenment.

Sermons on the life and teachings of Buddha are held and attended by followers. Many followers also free caged birds as a symbol of empathy and compassion for all living beings, on this day.

Question 22. Write a note on Guru Nanak Jayanti.
Answer:

Guru Nanak Jayanti:

Guru Nanak’s birth anniversary is celebrated as Guru Nanak Jayanti. The first guru of Sikhism, Guru Nanak, was born in 1469 AD at Talvandi village near Lahore (in present-day Pakistan).

Guru Nanak Jayanti is celebrated the world over by the Sikh community. The celebrations begin with Prabhat Pheries, singing hymns.

Two days prior to the day Akhand Path of the Guru Granth Sahib is held at the Gurudwaras. On the day before, processions called Nagarkirtans are organised. All these as an effort to spread the message and ideologies of Guru Nanak.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. What do you mean by tribal community?
Answer:

Tribal community:

The phrase ‘tribal community’ refers to special groups of the population, who have lived in a certain place for generations and have built their own unique social systems and culture.

They have their own languages and their entire livelihood is dependent on nature. Their main occupations are animal-rearing, cultivation, gathering wood, fruits, etc.

Question 2. Name the first, second and third-largest tribal community of India.
Answer:

The largest tribal community in India is the Gonds, the second largest tribal community is the Bhils and the third-largest tribal community is the Santhals.

Question 3. Which states of India have the maximum population of tribal people?
Answer:

Of the total population of India, 8.6% are tribes. Half of this population lives in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Jharkhand, Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat etc.

Question 4. Name the main tribal community of Chattisgarh.
Answer:

Chattisgarh is home to the people of the Gond, Kamara and Karwa.

Question 5. Name the tribes found in West Bengal.
Answer:

Santhal, Bhutia, Lodha, Hajong, Asur, Khond, Ho, etc. are the tribes found in West Bengal.

Question 6. In which states of India do people of the Gond tribe live?
Answer:

People of the Gond tribe are spread over the states of Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Bihar, Chattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, and Telangana.

Question 7. Name the tribes that have their homes mainly in Bihar.
Answer:

The Munda, Oraon, Santhal, Gond, Birjia, Asur, Savar, Parhaiya, Chero, Baiga and Birhor tribes have their homes mainly in Bihar.

Question 8. Write down the names of three states which match the name of the languages spoken there.
Answer:

  1. Assam-Assamese,
  2. Gujarat-Gujarati,
  3. Punjab-Punjabi.

Question 9. Write down the names of three states which do not match the name of the languages spoken there.
Answer:

  1. Andhra Pradesh-Telugu,
  2. Tripura- Bengali,
  3. Kerala-Malayalam.

Question 10. Write a short note on Gandhi Jayanti.
Answer:

Gandhi Jayanti:

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the Father of the Nation, was born on 2 October 1869 in Porbandar, Gujarat.

He was the central figure in India’s freedom movement. In his memory, Indians celebrate Gandhi Jayanti every year on 2nd October.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. Is A Hindi-Speaking State Of India—

  1. Meghalaya
  2. Rajasthan
  3. Jharkhand

Answer: 3. Jharkhand

Question 2. A Newly-Formed State Of India Is—

  1. Telangana
  2. Jharkhand
  3. Uttarakhand

Answer: 1. Telangana

Question 3. Nilgiri Mountains Are The Home To The Tribe Known As—

  1. Bhutia
  2. Toda
  3. Chenchu

Answer: 2. Toda

Question 4. The State That Is Famous For Kuchipudi Dance Is—

  1. Assam
  2. Andhra Pradesh
  3. Manipur

Answer: 2. Andhra Pradesh

Question 5. Is Home To The Jarawa Tribe.

  1. Andaman
  2. Madhya Pradesh
  3. Himachal Pradesh

Answer: 1. Andaman

Question 6. In India, The Influence Of Portuguese Culture Is Found In The State Of—

  1. Rajasthan
  2. Goa
  3. Bihar

Answer: 2. Goa

Question 7. The Bhojpuri Speaking People Belong To The State Of—

  1. Bihar
  2. Odisha
  3. Punjab

Answer: 1. Bihar

Question 8. Sindhi Is One Of The Main Languages Spoken In—

  1. Gujarat
  2. Maharashtra
  3. West Bengal

Answer: 1. Gujarat

Question 9. Dollu Kunitha Is A Dance Form Of—

  1. Karnataka
  2. Kerala
  3. Andhra Pradesh

Answer: 1. Karnataka

Question 10. Pongal Is Celebrated In The State Of—

  1. Karnataka
  2. Kerala
  3. Tamil Nadu

Answer: 3. Tamil Nadu

Question 11. Bihu Is A Dance Form Of—

  1. Assam
  2. West Bengal
  3. Manipur

Answer: 1. Assam

Question 12. Is The Third-Largest Tribal Community In India?

  1. Gond
  2. Bhil
  3. Santhal

Answer: 3. Santhal

Question 13. This Is The Main Festival Of Christians—

  1. Eid
  2. Diwali
  3. Christmas

Answer: 3. Christmas

Question 14. In India, We Celebrate Republic Day On—

  1. 6 January
  2. 15 August
  3. 26 January

Answer: 3. 26 January

Question 15. Is Celebrated As Gandhi Jayanti—

  1. 2 October
  2. 14 November
  3. 23 January

Answer: 1. 2 October

Question 16. Mahavira Jayanti Is Celebrated By—

  1. Buddhists
  2. Jains
  3. Sikhs Guru Nanak

Answer: 2. Jains

Question 17. Was The Founder Of—

  1. Buddhism
  2. Jainism
  3. Sikhism

Answer: 3. Sikhism

Question 18. Muharram Is A Festival Of—

  1. Sacrifice
  2. Happiness
  3. Fasting

Answer: 1. Sacrifice

Question 19. Eid-Ui-Fitr Is Celebrated By—

  1. Muslims
  2. Hindus
  3. Sikhs

Answer: 1. Muslims

Question 20. This Is Known As The ‘Festival Of Colours’—

  1. Diwali
  2. Holi
  3. Christmas

Answer: 2. Holi

Question 21. His Is The ‘Festival Of Lights—

  1. Diwali
  2. Holi
  3. Christmas

Answer: A. Diwali

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Fill in the blanks

Question 1. Christmas is celebrated on __________________ December.
Answer: 25

Question 2. India became independent on 15 August__________________
Answer: 1947

Question 3. Netaji Subash Chandra Bose’s birthday is celebrated on__________________ January.
Answer: 23

Question 4. The Indian Constitution came into force in the year__________________
Answer: 1950

Question 5. The Indian Constitution was drafted by__________________
Answer: Dr. B.R. Ambedkar

Question 6. The largest tribal community of India is__________________
Answer: Gond

Question 7. The second-largest tribal population of India is__________________
Answer: Bhil

Question 8. The Khasi tribe lives in the state of __________________
Answer: Meghalaya

Question 9. Liy is a nomadic,__________________ animal-rearing tribe of Jammu and Kashmir.
Answer: Gujjar/gurjar

Question 10. Jhum cultivation is still an occupation of __________________ tribe of Meghalaya.
Answer: Garo

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Write True Or False

Question 1. Konkani is the main language of Karnataka.
Answer: False

Question 2. Monpa is the name of one of the indigenous peoples of Arunachal Pradesh.
Answer: True

Question 3. The people of the Kadar community speak Malayalam.
Answer: True

Question 4. Gurjar or Gujjars are the people of Gujarat.
Answer: False

Question 5. Kashmir is known for its willow wood handicrafts.
Answer: True

Question 6. Poush Sankranti” or ‘Makar Sankranti’ is celebrated as Pongal in Tamil Nadu.
Answer: True

Question 7. Good Friday commemorates the death anniversary of Jesus Christ.
Answer: True

Question 8. Mahatma Gandhi is known as the ‘Father of the Nation’.
Answer: True

Question 9. Roja is observed by Muslims.
Answer: True

Question 10. The founder of Jainism is Mahavir.
Answer: True

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Match The Columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Tribes Match the following
Answer: 1-B,2-D,3-F,4-A,5-C,6-E

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic H Tribes And The People Of India Answer In One Or Two Words

Question 1. What is the main occupation of the Kinnaur tribe?
Answer: Animal-rearing.

Question 2. Which is the most spoken language of our country?
Answer: Hindi.

Question 3. Vada pav and Pav bhaji are famous food items from which state?
Answer: Maharashtra.

Question 4. ‘Sufi Sangeet’ is a famous tradition of which state or Union Territory?
Answer: Jammu and Kashmir.

Question 5. People of which state observe ‘Poush Sankranti’?
Answer: West Bengal.

Question 6. Which is the majorly spoken language of Goa?
Answer: Konkani.

Question 7. What is the main language of Andhra Pradesh?
Answer: Telugu.

Question 8. Which state, other than West Bengal, mainly speaks Bengali?
Answer: Tripura.

Question 9. Which is the main festival of the West Bengal / Bengali community?
Answer: Durga Puja.

Question 10. What is the name of the tribal community found in Nagaland?
Answer: Naga.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1. What are the characteristics of a national park?
Answer:

The characteristics of a National Park, as specified by the IUCN are as follows—

  1. A National Park is an ecosystem substantially unchanged by human interference, where the flora, the fauna, and the specific landforms are of special interest.
  2. It is also protected from industrialization and population.
  3. It must be of a minimum size of 1000 hectares, where natural protection holds the highest priority.
  4. The demarcated area is owned by the national government.
  5. Visitors are allowed for camping and outdoor activities.
  6. Ban on the exploitation of natural resources.
  7. National Parks are designated by the IUCN under its category II protected area.

Question 2. Differentiate between Reserved Forest and Protected Forest.
Answer:

The difference between Reserved Forest and Protected Forest are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India reserved and protected forest

Question 3. Differentiate between Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park
Answer:

The differences between Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India wildlife sanctuary and national park

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. What is meant by wildlife?
Answer:

Wildlife:

Wildlife is a collection of natural fauna and sometimes flora of a region that grows and survives without human interference.

Wildlife is a basic part of any ecosystem, but if not protected with the care it may even lead to an imbalance in the respective ecosystems.

It is an essential duty of a country, state, region, or community to work toward the protection of the wildlife of that region.

Question 2. What is meant by a Reserved Forest?
Answer:

Protected Forest:

A forest in which hunting, grazing, and other human activities are prohibited is known as a Reserved Forest. It is a protected forest area under the Indian Forest Act, of 1927.

A reserved forest enjoys greater security as compared to other protected forests. For example, Tikarapada Reserved Forest in Odisha.

Question 3. What Is meant by a Protected Forest?
Answer:

Protected Forest:

A forest in which rights of activities like hunting and grazing are allowed to a certain extent to communities dependent on them is known as a Protected Forest.

Protected Forest is conferred with a limited amount of protection under the Indian Forest Act, of 1927.

Protected forests are of two types demarcated protected forests and un-demarcated Protected forests.

Question 4. What is meant by a Sanctuary?
Answer:

Sanctuary:

A Sanctuary is a place, protected by law, in which endangered birds and other animals are safe from being hunted, killed, or poached.

Here, they can live and breed without interference in a forest a large area with thick clusters of different species of trees and undergrowth.

The animals and birds living in a forest are completely dependent on the forest for their habitats and surroundings.

Ranganthittu Bird Sanctuary in Karnataka and Bethuadahari wildlife sanctuary in West Bengal are popular Sanctuaries in India.

Question 5. What is meant by a National Park?
Answer:

National Park:

A National Park refers to a large tract of natural land set aside by the national government for the preservation of its natural environment.

The landscapes with their plants and animals are preserved in their natural state. It comes under IUCN category II protected areas and is generally open for camping and outdoor recreation for visitors.

Jim Corbett National Park is known to be the first National Park in India.

Question 6. What is meant by a Zoological park?
Answer:

Zoological park:

An area of land or a place where various species of birds are protected from humans, other animals, and other predatory birds to conserve their natural habitat and promote their rehabilitation and survival.

Here, the birds are also encouraged to breed. Generally, various species of birds are given shelter and the place is open to visitors.

Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary in Rajasthan; Ranganthittu Bird Sanctuary in Karnataka and Kulik Bird Sanctuary in West Bengal are examples of well-known Bird Sanctuaries in India.

Question 7. What is meant by a Zoological Park?
Answer:

Zoological Park:

A Zoological Park is a park or an establishment where living animals are kept within enclosures for tourist attraction and may even serve as a purpose of the study.

Living animals are also bred here. The word ’zoological’ is derived from the Greek words ’zoon’ meaning animal and ‘logia’ meaning the study of. Nandankanan Zoological Park, Odisha; and Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, West Bengal are two famous zoos in India.

Question 8. What is meant by a Botanical Garden?
Answer:

Botanical Garden:

A garden entirely devoted to the cultivation, collection, and display of a variety of plants and trees tagged with their botanical names is known as a botanical garden.

A botanical garden may be specific to a certain kind of plant (for example, medicinal or herb) or from a specific plant of the world.

In many botanical gardens, greenhouses are utilized to grow special groups of plants. Visitors can go on educational exhibitions, and tours and also see the library (botanical) facilities.

Acharya Jagadish Chandra Bose Indian Botanic Garden in West Bengal, Lalbagh Botanical Garden in Karnataka and Empress Botanical Garden in Maharastra are some important Botanical Gardens in India.

Question 9. What is Wildlife Protection Act?
Answer:

Wildlife Protection Act:

The law introduced by the Government of India on September 9, 1972, for the protection of wildlife, is called the Wildlife Protection Act.

Aim: The main aim of this law is to protect wildlife, birds, and forests.

Rule of law: If one breaks the law, he will be punished according to Indian Penal Code.

Observation: In India, the first week of October (1st to 7th) is observed as Wildlife Week every year.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. What is meant by a forest?
Answer:

Forest:

A forest is a large area with a thick cluster of different species of trees and undergrowth.

The animals and birds living in a forest are completely dependent on the forest for their food and habitat. It is a region rich in biodiversity.

Question 2. What are migratory birds?
Answer:

Migratory birds:

In winter, some birds fly from cold countries to our country. When the summer is about to begin, they go back to their country. These birds are called migratory birds.

Examples: Siberian storks, Hooping storks, Golden Clover, and Puffins from the Siberian region of Russia.

Question 3. Why do we need to conserve wildlife?
Answer:

The reasons for which we need to conserve wildlife are listed below—

  1. To protect the various species of flora and fauna and their respective breeding areas and habitats.
  2. To protect the natural beauty of the forest land and conserve the endangered species.
  3. To protect and preserve various flora and fauna, which in turn help to preserve the local ecosystem.

Question 4. List the various methods to conserve wildlife.
Answer:

The various methods to conserve wildlife are as follows—

  1. Ensuring a protected habitat for wildlife.
  2. Protect wildlife from poachers.
  3. To reduce the threat to endangered species.

Question 5. Name some of the Reserved Forests in India.
Answer:

The following are some of the important Reserved Forests in India—

  1. Annekal Reserved Forest, Western Ghats
  2. Banni Grasslands Reserve, Gujarat
  3. Jakanari Reserve Forest
  4. Tamil Nadu
  5. Kukrail Reserve Forest,
  6. Uttar PradeshJogimatti Reserve Forest,
  7. Karnataka.

Question 6. Name some of the Wildlife Sanctuaries in India.
Answer:

The following are some of the important Wildlife Sanctuaries in India—

  1. Koderma Wildlife Sanctuary, Jharkhand
  2. Dandeli Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnataka
  3. Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary, Maharashtra
  4. Chilika Bird Sanctuary, Odisha
  5. Bethuadahari Wildlife Sanctuary, West Bengal.

Question 7. Name some of the National Parks in India.
Answer:

The following are some of the most important National Parks in India—

  1. Jim Corbett National Park,
  2. Uttarakhand (the first designated National Park in India).
  3. Simlipal National Park,
  4. Odisha; Kaziranga National Park,
  5. Assam; Kanha National Park,
  6. Madhya Pradesh;
  7. Gorumara National Park, West Bengal.

Question 8. Name some of the National Parks in West Bengal.
Answer:

The following are some of the most important national parks in West Bengal—

  1. Gorumara National Park, Jalpaiguri;
  2. Neora Valley National Park,
  3. Kalimpong; Singalila National Park,
  4. Darjeeling; Sunderban National Park,
  5. South 24 Parganas; Jaldapara National Park, Alipurduar.

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. The oldest zoological park in India is in—

  1. Alipore
  2. Shibpur
  3. Kanpur

Answer: 1. Alipore

Question 2. Royal Bengal tigers can only be found in—

  1. Gir
  2. Sunderbans
  3. Kanha

Answer: 2. Sunderbans

Question 3. Is the national bird of India.

  1. Peacock
  2. Ostrich
  3. Falcon

Answer: 1. Peacock

Question 4. Gorumara national park is famous for—

  1. Indian rhinoceros
  2. Red panda
  3. Tiger

Answer: 1. Indian rhinoceros

Question 5. Manas national park is situated in—

  1. Assam
  2. Meghalaya
  3. Uttarakhand

Answer: 1. Assam

Question 6. Panchmarhi biosphere reserve is situated in—

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Chattisgarh
  3. Odisha

Answer: 1. Madhya Pradesh

Question 7. Simlipal national park is located in—

  1. West Bengal
  2. Odisha
  3. Kerala

Answer: 2. West Bengal

Question 8. ‘Wildlife Institute of India’ is situated in—

  1. Dehradun
  2. Bhopal
  3. Kolkata

Answer: 1. Dehradun

Question 9. ‘Indian Institute of forest management is situated in—

  1. Dehradun
  2. Bhopal
  3. Kolkata

Answer: 2. Bhopal

Question 10. Sunderbans stretches through the state of—

  1. Odisha
  2. Bihar
  3. West Bengal

Answer: 3. West Bengal

Question 11. Currently, the number of authorized national parks in India is—

  1. 156
  2. 120
  3. 101

Answer: 3. 101

Question 12. Kodarma is a—

  1. Reserve forest
  2. National Forest
  3. Sanctuary

Answer: 1. Reserve forest

Question 13. Gorumara national park is located in—

  1. West Bengal
  2. Bihar
  3. Meghalaya

Answer: 1. West Bengal

Question 14. Is a famous bird sanctuary in West Bengal.

  1. Kulik
  2. Sunderbans
  3. Jaldapara

Answer: 1. Kulik

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Fill in the blanks

Question 1. The variety of plants and animals in the world is known as____________________
Answer: Biodiversity

Question 2. ____________________ Forest is India’s largest wildlife conservation center.
Answer: Gir National Park

Question 3. ____________________ birds fly down to our country in the winter months from cold countries.
Answer: Migratory

Question 4. The full form of WWF is ____________________
Answer: World wildlife fund

Question 5. ____________________ is the only means of traveling in deserts.
Answer: Camel

Question 6. Dolphins belong to the ____________________ family.
Answer: Mammal

Question 7. Snakes belong to the ____________________ family.
Answer: Reptile

Question 8. Ranthambore National Park is famous for being a safe home to ____________________
Answer: Tigers

Question 9. Earth Day is observed every year on ____________________ April.
Answer: 22

Question 10. The Wildlife Protection Act Law was introduced in the year ____________________
Answer: 1972

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Write True Or False

Question 1. Royal Bengal Tiger is an extinct species.
Answer: False

Question 2. Royal Bengal Tiger can be spotted in the Gir forest of Gujarat.
Answer: False

Question 3. Anaconda is the world’s largest-known snake.
Answer: False

Question 4. Earth Day was observed for the first time on 22nd April 1970.
Answer: True

Question 5. The United Nations Conference on Human Environment, 1972 was held in Stockholm.
Answer: True

Question 6. Puffin is a kind of migratory bird.
Answer: True

Question 7. Bhitarkanika National Park in Odisha is famous for bison.
Answer: False

Question 8. Mudumalai National Park is one of the most well-known sanctuaries in Gujarat.
Answer: False

Question 9. Bethuadahari in the Nadia district of West Bengal is noted for its deer population.
Answer: True

Question 10. The crocodile population is a major attraction at Jaldapara National Park.
Answer: False

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Match The Columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India match the following
Answer: 1-B,2-D,3-C,4-E,5-A

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic F Forests And Wildlife Of India Answer In One Or Two Words

Question 1. What is the most important resource of a forest?
Answer: Wood.

Question 2. Expand IUCN.
Answer: International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Question 3. In which month is ‘Wildlife Week’ observed in India?
Answer: October (2-8).

Question 4. Which forest in Gujarat is famous for its lions?
Answer: Gir.

Question 5. In which type of forest is hunting completely prohibited?
Answer: Reserved Forest.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1. There is much diversity in natural vegetation in different places in India. Why is it so? Or, Why are there variations among the natural vegetation of different regions in India?
Answer:

Given:

There is much diversity in natural vegetation in different places in India.

Based on rainfall, altitude and temperature of different regions, variations are found among natural vegetation of different regions.

For example- Evergreen forests are found in regions (Andaman and Nicobar Islands, the western slopes of the Western Ghats, etc.)

that receive more than 200 cm of annual rainfall whereas deciduous forests are found in regions that receive 100-200 cm of annual rainfall and no rainfall in winter.

Thorny bushes and shrubs are found in the regions (Rajasthan, Gujarat) which receive an annual rainfall of less than 50 cm. Variations in rainfall and temperature are found with the rise in altitude.

As a result, deciduous forests are found at an altitude of 1,000-2,000 metres, coniferous forests are found at an altitude of 2,000-4,000 metres and alpine grasslands grow at an altitude more than 4,000 metres above sea level. Mangroves are found in coastal saline soils.

Question 2. Classify the different types of natural vegetation found in India.
Answer:

The various types of natural vegetation found in India are-

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India natural vegetation

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India natural vegatation of indiaWBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India natural vegetation.2

 

Question 3. Forests are our friends’-Explain. Or, Why should we conserve forests?
Answer:

We regard forests as our friends because-

Trees absorb harmful carbon dioxide and release purified oxygen in the air which is essential for life on Earth.

Plants help in causing rainfall by increasing the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere through transpiration. Plants prevent soil erosion.

The roots bind the soil very firmly and prevent it from being washed away. Trees provide resources such as honey, wax, gum, resin, fruits, flowers and wood.

Forests are home to diverse organisms and plants. Forest wood is used as a raw material for paper, rayon and other handicraft industries. Forests prevent the extension of deserts, increase the fertility of the soil and also help to maintain the ecological balance.

Question 4. Write the steps you would take to save forests.
Answer:

The steps you would take to save forests:

If we do not save forests, the ecological balance of our earth will be disturbed and this will affect our survival. We can take the following steps to save the forests-

Afforestation and restriction of the felling of trees:

Planting trees in bare lands near rivers, ponds, railway tracks, roads, bare land around our houses, playgrounds and other places where plants can be grown. Only mature trees should be felled and cutting of immature trees should be prohibited.

Resisting deforestation: It is advisable to cut as few trees as possible.

Restricted grazing: Grazing has negative effects on vegetation. Grazing should be on specific grasslands. There should be bans on grazing in forests.

Appointment of forest rangers: There should be rangers in forests to protect forest resources and wildlife.

Increasing awareness: Natural vegetation is important to us. Everyone should be aware of the need for the conservation of trees and forest resources from childhood. Special measures should be taken to create awareness about the preservation of greenery.

Question 5 Discuss the various medicinal plants.
Answer:

The various medicinal plants are as follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India names of the plants

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. What is natural vegetation? What are the optimum conditions of temperature and rainfall needed for the growth of natural vegetation?
Answer:

Natural vegetation:

The vegetation which grows naturally and sustains in a region without any human interference is known as natural

A minimum temperature of 16°C is required for the growth of natural vegetation. The desirable rate of growth of a plant occurs in temperatures ranging from 28°C-30°C. The amount of rainfall is different in different climatic zones.

The amount of annual rainfall is more than 200 cm in equatorial regions and in desert areas, the annual rainfall is less than 25 cm. A minimum of 50 cm of rainfall annually is required for the growth of natural vegetation.

Question 2. Write the features of the vegetation of Tropical evergreen forests.
Answer:

The following features are found in the vegetation of Tropical evergreen forests—

  1. The trees remain green throughout the year.
  2. They are very tall and often play the role of host to climbers on their trunks and branches.
  3. They yield very hard and heavy wood. O The roots of the trees are very thick.

Question 3. Evergreen vegetation is found in equatorial climates. Give a reason why.
Answer:

Evergreen vegetation is found in equatorial climates:

The climate of equatorial regions is warm and humid. Rainfall and temperature are the two main factors responsible for the growth of a plant.

The temperature of the equatorial region always remains high (25°C-35°C), and this region also receives heavy rainfall (150-200 cm annually).

Soil always remains moist due to heavy rainfall and there is the presence of sufficient humidity. Plants remain evergreen in this region because of the sufficient amount of water, temperature and humidity.

Question 4. Write the features of the vegetation of Tropical deciduous forests.
Answer:

The features of Tropical deciduous forests are—

  1. The plants lose their leaves in the dry season (winter).
  2. The plants attain a height of 30-50 metres.
  3. The plants do not grow very close to each other.
  4. The trunks are very soft and are used as raw materials for lumbering.

Question 5. Deciduous vegetation is found in seasonal climatic regions. Give a reason why.
Answer:

Deciduous vegetation is found in seasonal climatic regions.

Seasonal climatic regions receive rainfall only in the rainy season, there is no rainfall in winter. Plants of this region shed their leaves in the dry season to prevent transpiration.

For these reasons, deciduous trees grow in seasonal climatic regions. Sal, Teak, and Pipal are some examples of deciduous trees.

Question 6. What are the features of vegetation found in hot desert regions?
Answer:

Generally, thorny bushes and shrubs are found in desert regions.

Their features are—

  1. The leaves are modified into thorns and in some cases, the leaves are very small so as to prevent transpiration from the surface of the leaves.
  2. The stems are covered with a waxy coating.
  3. The roots grow deep into the soil to collect water.

Question 7. The leaves of the plants found in desert regions are modified into spines or thorns. Why?
Answer:

The leaves of the plants found in desert regions are modified into spines or thorns.

The amount of rainfall is very low in desert areas (average 25-50cm). But the temperature is very high (about 35°C-40°C).

The moisture content of the soil is very low in this dry-hot climate because of which roots are very long and grow deep into the soil in order to collect water.

To prevent the loss of water, leaves become very small and are often modified into spines or thorns. This is the main adaptive feature of desert plants.

Question 8. Discuss the features of conifers.
Answer:

The features of conifers are—

  1. Conifers are cone-shaped tall trees.
  2. The leaves are needle-shaped which prevents the accumulation of snow on them.
  3. The stems of the trees yield softwood.

Question 9. What type of climate is required for the growth of evergreen and coniferous vegetation?
Answer:

Minimum temperatures of 25°C-35°C/ more than 200cm annual rainfall and 60%-75% humidity are required for the growth of evergreen vegetation.

Coniferous vegetation grows in temperate regions. These regions receive about 50-100 cm of annual rainfall and may receive snowfall in winter. The average annual temperature is around 15°C.

Question 10. Differentiate between evergreen and deciduous vegetation.
Answer:

The differences between evergreen and deciduous vegetation are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India point of diffrences evergreen deciduous vegetation

Question 11. Differentiate between coastal vegetation and desert vegetation.
Answer:

The differences between coastal vegetation and desert vegetation are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India point of diffrences Coastal vegetation and desert vegatation

Question 12. Write the differences between evergreen and coniferous vegetation.
Answer:

The differences between evergreen and coniferous vegetation are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India point of difference evergreen and coniferous vegetation

Question 13. Write the differences between stilt root and breathing root.
Answer:

The difference between stilt root and breathing root are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India point of diffrences slit root and breathing root

Question 14. What do you get from natural vegetation?
Answer:

The benefits of natural vegetation are as follows—

Natural vegetation absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and releases oxygen into the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Oxygen is important for the survival of all animal species in the world.

Vegetation cover adds moisture to the atmosphere, which helps to cause rainfall, and checks floods and droughts. It also provides shade during hot summers.

It provides food and fuel wood.

It provides raw materials to the wood industry and paper industries. 0 It reduces soil erosion and renders habitat to birds and animals.

Question 15. What do you think are the ill effects of cutting down trees?
Answer:

A few ill effects of cutting down trees or deforestation on the environment are—

  1. Increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the environment and decrease in the amount of oxygen.
  2. Increase in the rate of soil erosion.

Question 16. How do certain plants remain evergreen throughout the year? Or, Why do leaves remain green throughout the year?
Answer:

Certain plants remain evergreen throughout the year because they grow in areas with heavy rainfall.

The annual rainfall ranges between 200 cm and above, so the soil of that area always remains moist and the supply of water for the plants remains constant.

The annual average temperature ranges between 25°C-35°C. Thus, the plants thrive in conditions with adequate temperature and rainfall.

Also, instead of a particular season, these plants lose their leaves throughout the year, and so, retain an evergreen appearance throughout the year.

Question 17. List a few reasons for the destruction of forests.
Answer:

The following are a few reasons for the destruction of forests—

  1. Forests are destroyed due to the illegal felling of trees for fuel wood or for the paper industry.
  2. The expense of agricultural land is another reason for deforestation.
  3. Forests are also destroyed for jhum cultivation and excessive cattle grazing.
  4. A natural cause of the destruction of forests is forest fires.

Question 18. Discuss the various steps taken for forest conservation.
Answer:

Forests play a vital role in maintaining the ecological balance of a region and that of the entire world.

Forests are also important for the economic development of a country.

So, the following steps are taken for conservation of the forest resources—

1. Plantation of trees: Measures are being taken to increase the number of plants by planting trees in different places like schools, riversides, and temples and then, protecting them from grazing animals.

2. Implementation of law: The government is implementing various laws to resist deforestation and strict monitoring of entry into and exit from forests is done to restrict the activity of wood-smugglers.

3. Others: It is possible to conserve forests by protecting old forestlands, planting trees on barren wastelands, tackling forest fires resisting the attack of disease-spreading organisms, and giving importance to social and agriculture afforestation.

Question 19. Greenery is gradually being lost. State why.
Answer:

Loss of greenery means loss of trees.

Reasons for the loss of greenery are—

  1. Unscientific deforestation.
  2. Smuggling of priceless products of the forests.
  3. The increasing population puts pressure on land, thus causing the destruction of forests.
  4. Deforestation for accumulation of industrial raw materials.
  5. Miles and miles of forests are scorched and destroyed because of forest fires.
  6. Forests are being destroyed because of nuclear bombing.

Question 20. Write the differences between garden and forest land
Answer:

The differences between garden and forest land are as follows—

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Short Answer Questions

Question 1. Name the types found In India.
Answer:

There are five major types of natural vegetation in India.

They are—

  1. Tropical evergreen vegetation,
  2. Tropical deciduous vegetation,
  3. Thorny bushes and shrubs,
  4. Coastal mangrove or saline vegetation and
  5. Temperate montane vegetation.

Question 2. What is evergreen vegetation?
Answer:

Evergreen Vegetation:

The trees that retain fresh green leaves throughout the year because of the availability of adequate rainfall (200 cm every year on an average) and suitable temperature (yearly average of 25°C-35°C) are categorised as evergreen vegetation.

Rubber, Mahogany, Rosewood, and Ebony are some examples of evergreen vegetation.

Question 3. Where are Tropical evergreen forests found in India?
Answer:

Tropical evergreen forests found in India:

Tropical evergreen forests are found in the southern regions of India—

Notably the western slope of the Western Ghats and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. These forests are also found in the state of northeastern regions and the Dooars region of West Bengal.

Question 4. What is deciduous vegetation?
Answer:

Deciduous vegetation:

Trees which lose their leaves in a particular season, mainly in dry winters to prevent further loss of water are categorised as deciduous vegetation. Sal, Teak, Sandal, and Banyan are some examples of deciduous vegetation.

Question 5. Where are tropical deciduous Forests found in India?
Answer:

Tropical deciduous Forests found in India:

Generally, Tropical deciduous forests are found in the regions of the Gangetic Plains such as the states of West Bengal, Assam, and Bihar. They are also found in the Peninsular Plateau region and foothills of the Himalayan regions.

Question 6. What do you mean by Thorny bushes and shrubs?
Answer:

Thorny bushes and shrubs:

In some plants, the leaves are modified into spines or thorns and the stem is modified to form a special fleshy leaf-like structure that retains water.

This happens in areas with water scarcity and these plants are categorised as thorny bushes and shrubs. Cacti, Acacia, and Date Palm are some examples of Thorny bushes and shrubs.

Question 7. What do you mean by Coastal mangrove forest or saline vegetation?
Answer:

Coastal mangrove forest or saline vegetation:

Coastal mangrove forest or saline vegetation is a type of natural vegetation that grows in saline coastal areas.

Stilt roots and breathing roots are the main features of saline vegetation. Sundari, Goran, Hetal, and Screw pines (Keya) are some examples of coastal mangrove or saline vegetation.

Question 8. Name the locations of Mangrove forests in India.
Answer:

The locations of Mangrove forests in India:

Mangrove forests are found in regions adjacent to Sundarbans in West Bengal, Chilika Lake in Odisha, Kolleru Lake and Pulicat Lake in Andhra Pradesh.

Mangroves are also found in regions adjacent to the Gulf of Khambat and Rann of Kutch in Gujarat.

Question 9. Why do stilt roots develop in saline vegetation?
Answer:

Stilt roots develop in saline vegetation:

Saline vegetation is found in places having saline sedimentary soils. The high and low tides are very frequent in these regions along the coast, and the sea waves hit the plant roots at regular intervals.

The vegetation of these regions has thus, evolved to produce adventitious roots from lateral branches in order to provide them extra support and anchoring in the soft and unstable soil. These roots are known as stilt roots.

Question 10. Why are breathing roots found in saline vegetation?
Answer:

Breathing roots found in saline vegetation:

Saline vegetation like the mangroves grow in areas which are affected by tides on a regular basis. The roots remain immersed in water and thus respiration becomes difficult.

Also, saline vegetation grows on saline soil. Saline soil contains an insufficient amount of oxygen.

In order to obtain oxygen from the atmosphere for gaseous exchange, the roots of saline vegetation emerge above the soil. These roots are known as breathing roots or pneumatophores.

Question 11. What is meant by Temperate montane forests?
Answer:

Temperate montane forests:

The natural vegetation that grows at places with an altitude of more than 1500 metres, an average annual temperature of 15°C or less and an annual average rainfall of 50-100 cm is categorised as Temperate montane forests or Coniferous vegetation.

Question 12. Name the locations of Temperate montane forests in India.
Answer:

The locations of Temperate montane forests in India:

Temperate montane forests are found in the Himalayan mountain regions of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, and Uttarakhand in northern India.

In eastern India, they are found in Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim and Darjeeling. They are also found in Nilgiri and Annamalai Hills in southern India.

Question 13. Why do leaves fall during specific seasons?
Answer:

Leaves fall during specific seasons:

Generally, trees lose their leaves in the dry season (winter) to reduce the loss of moisture from the surface of leaves.

In the dry season, the water available to plants and trees from rainfall is already low, thus to prevent further loss of moisture, the trees shed their leaves.

Question 14. Why are the leaves of the coniferous trees needle-shaped?
Answer:

The leaves of the coniferous trees needle-shaped:

Conifers mainly grow in regions of high altitude with snowfall.

The leaves of conifers are needle-shaped. As needle-shaped leaves are narrow and have a very small surface area, the snow cannot remain on the leaves. Thus, needle-shaped leaves of conifers protect the plant from snow damage.

Question 15. What is forest conservation?
Answer:

Forest conservation:

Forest conservation means the protection of forests as well as using forest resources in a sustainable way so that they will remain available for future generations.

While forest products are important to foster economic development, we must remember that forests play a vital role in maintaining the ecological balance of the region and the entire world.

So, proper forest conservation that takes care of both aspects is very important today.

Question 16. What is Ayurveda?
Answer:

Ayurveda:

In India, since ancient times, medicinal plants have been used to treat and heal diseases. The medical method that has developed from it is known as Ayurveda.

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. Forest Area Percentage In India Should Ideally Be—

  1. 20%
  2. 23%
  3. 33%

Answer: 2. 23%

Question 2. The State That Accounts For The Highest Forested Area In India—

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. West Bengal
  3. Kerala

Answer: 1. Madhya Pradesh

Question 3. Deodar, Pine Are Found In The—

  1. Himalayas
  2. Leeward Side Of The Western Ghats
  3. Foothills Of Aravalli

Answer: 1. Himalayas

Question 4. In The Year The National Forest Policy Resolution Was Adopted.

  1. 1952
  2. 1955
  3. 1950

Answer: 1. 1952

Question 5. The Forest Research Institute Is Located In—

  1. Cuttack, Odisha
  2. Dehradun, Uttarakhand
  3. Pusa, Delhi

Answer: 2. Dehradun, Uttarakhand

Question 6. In India, Mangrove Forests Are Found In—

  1. Uttarakhand
  2. Sunderbans
  3. Dandakaranya

Answer: 2. Sunderbans

Question 7. Is A Variety Of Mountainous Tree.

  1. Rhododendron
  2. Rosewood
  3. Teak

Answer: 1. Rhododendron

Question 8. Salt-Water Plants Are Better Known As—

  1. Deciduous Plants
  2. Cacti
  3. Mangroves

Answer: 3. Mangroves

Question 9. Is A Variety Of Evergreen Tree.

  1. Sal
  2. Palash
  3. Mahogany

Answer: 3. Mahogany

Question 10. Breathing Roots And Stilt Roots Can Be Seen In—

  1. Deciduous Trees
  2. Evergreen Trees
  3. Mangrove Trees

Answer: 1. Deciduous Trees

Question 11. Forest Can Be Seen On The Western Slope Of The Western Ghats.

  1. Coniferous
  2. Deciduous
  3. Evergreen

Answer: 3. Evergreen

Question 12. Mangroves Can Stand Upright On Marshy Land With The Help Of—

  1. Stilt Roots
  2. Breathing Roots
  3. Fibrous Roots

Answer: 1. Stilt Roots

Question 13. The Largest Mangrove Forest In India Can Be Seen In—

  1. Sunderbans
  2. Himalayan Foothills
  3. Western Slope Of The Western Ghats

Answer: 1. Sunderbans

Question 14. The Trees That Shed Their Leaves Are Known As—

  1. Deciduous Trees
  2. Evergreen Trees
  3. Alpine Trees

Answer: 1. Deciduous Trees

Question 15. Acacia Is A Variety Of—

  1. Mangrove
  2. Evergreen
  3. Thorny Bush

Answer: 3. Thorny Bush

Question 16. In West Bengal, Cinchona Tree Grows Mainly In—

  1. Hugli
  2. Bardhaman
  3. Paschim Medinipur
  4. Darjeeling District

Answer: 4. Darjeeling District

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Fill In The Blanks

Question 1. India has a variety of almost_____________plants.
Answer: 5000

Question 2. The plant life of India can be classified into _____________ groups.
Answer: 5

Question 3. The vegetation of the Andaman Islands of India is primarily of _____________ type.
Answer: Evergreen

Question 4. The vegetation of Rajasthan can be classified as_____________
Answer: Thorny Bushes

Question 5. Peepal tree belongs to the_____________ family.
Answer: Deciduous

Question 6. _____________type of vegetation can be found in the Himalayan foothills.
Answer: Tropical Deciduous

Question 7. The Sunderbans acquired their name from _____________ tree.
Answer: Sundari

Question 8. The Forest Research Institute,_____________ Dehradun was established in the year
Answer: 1906

Question 9. _____________is the natural occurrence of fire in Forests.
Answer: Forest fire

Question 10. _____________ type of vegetation grows in cold climates and places with an altitude of more than 1500 metres.
Answer: Coniferous

Question 11. Plants take in from the_____________ atmosphere.
Answer: Carbon Dioxide

Question 12. Tidal forests are also known as _____________ forests.
Answer: Mangrove

Question 13. Among the Union Territories,_____________ shows the highest spread of forest cover.
Answer: Andaman And Nicobar

Question 14. The shape of the leaves is formed like ____________to prevent accumulation of snow on the leaves in the mountainous regions.
Answer: Needle

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Match The Columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India match the following
Answer: 1-B,2-A,3-D,4-E,5-C

 

Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic E Natural Vegetation Of India Write True Or False

Question 1. Viviparous germination occurs in the Sandalwood tree.
Answer: False

Question 2. Jarul is a deciduous tree.
Answer: True

Question 3. Cedar and Poplar are thorny shrubs.
Answer: False

Question 4. The important features of the Mangrove forests are breathing roots and stilt roots.
Answer: True

Question 5. Forestation for recreation is known as ‘Social Forestry’.
Answer: False

Question 6. Jhum cultivation is a reason for the destruction of forest lands.
Answer: True

Question 7. Forests use 02 and release C02.
Answer: False

Question 8. The paper industry uses timber from forests.
Answer: True

Question 9. Conifers are cone-shaped trees, standing upright.
Answer: True

Question 10. Oak and Pine are deciduous trees.
Answer: False

Question 1. When is the International Day of Forests?
Answer: 21 March.

Question 2. When is World Environment Day?
Answer: 5 June.

Question 3. Which pigment is responsible for the green colour of leaves?
Answer: Chlorophyll.

Question 4. Which part of a plant becomes modified as thorns or spines in thorny plants?
Answer: The leaf.

Question 5. Which kind of trees yields very hard and heavy wood?
Answer: Evergreen trees.

Question 6. Which kind of trees yields softwood?
Answer: Coniferous trees.

Question 7. Which tree’s timber does the paper industry use as raw material?
Answer: Conifers.

Question 8. Which wood is best for making furniture?
Answer: Teak wood.

Question 9. What is the name of the grassland formed by tall grasses found in dry deciduous forests?
Answer: Savannah.

Question 10. Which is the dominant kind of vegetation in our country?
Answer: Tropical deciduous.

Question 11. Where is Cinchona found in West Bengal?
Answer: Mongpu in Darjeeling district.

Question 12. Which day is celebrated as the ‘Sundarban Divas’?
Answer: 21 August.

Question 13. What ratio of forest to land area is needed to maintain environmental balance?
Answer: 33: 67.

Question 14. In which year did the Forest Conservation Act come into force in India?
Answer: 1980.

Question 15. What is the use of Oak bark?
Answer: Used for leather tanning.

Question 16. Which tree’s bark is used to make the wooden stoppers of bottles?
Answer: Cork tree.

Question 17. What is the maximum height attained by the conifers?
Answer: 80-85 metres.

Question 18. In which region of India are Tropical grasslands found?
Answer: Deccan Plateau.

Question 19. Mention a natural cause for the destruction of forests.
Answer: Forest fire.

Question 20. Are those crops cultivated by the farmers or the plants in our garden pots natural vegetation?
Answer: No.

Question 21. What are the thorns of thorny bushes?
Answer: Leaves modified to spines or thorns.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1 Discuss in detail the characteristics of the major soils found in India.
Answer:

The characteristics of the major soils found in India are explained in the table below-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India Soil type

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India major soil regions of india

 

Question 2. Describe the desert type and montane type of soil in India.
Answer:

Desert soil:

1. Occurrence: This type of soil is found in the desert regions of Rajasthan, the Rann region of the Kachchh, and the western flanks of Punjab and Haryana.

2. Characteristics: The main characteristics of desert soil are as follows-

The soil develops in areas of very low rainfall and very high temperature, Top soil has a high concentration of salts, The soil is porous in nature and thus has a lower water-retention capacity, Poor in organic matter content.

Effect on agriculture: Suitable for the cultivation of millets (jowar, bajra and ragi). Currently, even wheat, barley, cotton and sugarcane are cultivated with the aid of irrigation.

Montane soil:

1. Occurrence: This type of soil can be found in the Himalayan region, mountainous regions of the Nilgiris, Western Ghats and similar regions.

2. Characteristics: The main characteristics of montane soil are as follows-

It forms in the humid temperate climatic region, It is acidic in nature, Though acidic in nature, it is fertile soil, and It is rich in organic matter content.

Effect on agriculture: Suitable for the cultivation of crops like tea, coffee and spices.

Question 3. What is soil important for?
Answer:

The desert type and the montane type of soil in India is described below-

Soil is important for the following reasons 

The habitat of plants and animals: All the members of the biosphere depend on it for their habitat, food and survival.

Agriculture: The quality of agriculture and quantity of yield is determined by the type of soil.

Maintaining humidity in the environment: It plays an important role in maintaining the moisture content in the atmosphere.

Clay modelling: The entire pottery industry thrives on the soil. Even idols are made of soil.

Materials for construction: Soil is an important component for building houses. Bricks, tiles, etc. are all made from soil.

Cottage industry: It is the major component for various kinds of construction work, as well as art and handicrafts.

Origin of Plants and Forest: The natural vegetation that grows in a region is influenced by the soil type and so are the products obtained from them.

Grazing: Activities like animal rearing and cattle farming is solely dependent on the Soil.

Question 4. What is meant by soil erosion? What are the major causes of soil erosion?
Answer:

Soil erosion:

The degradation of soil and the removal of its top layer by the action of eroding agents (river, glacier, wind or sea waves) or by human interference is known as soil erosion.

The major causes of soil erosion are as follows-

1. Deforestation: The roots of the trees bind the soil and in the process, protect the soil from being washed away by the agents of erosion. With careless deforestation, the soil becomes more susceptible to erosion.

2. Uncontrolled grazing: Reckless overgrazing can be a major cause of soil erosion.

3. Excessive cultivation: The processes of multiple cropping, intensive farming or Jhum cultivation on the hill slope lead to soil erosion.

4. Mining: Unplanned mining activities to extract mineral resources turn out to be a major cause of soil erosion.

5. Faulty irrigation practices: Unscientific irrigation practices leads to an increase in the rate of soil erosion.

6. Unmindful use of land: The land use of places with different physical features has to be different. So, unmindful use of land most of the time leads to an irreversible process of soil erosion.

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. ‘Black soil is very fertile’-Explain.
Answer:

Black soil is very fertile:

Black soil is formed from basaltic rocks. The structure of black soil is extremely compact and highly moisture-retentive. Deep wide cracks develop when this soil dries-which helps in aeration.

Usually, these soils are rich in clay content (average 50%) and high in organic matter Crops, especially legumes and cotton grow well in this soil. All these facts tell us that black soil is very fertile.

Question 2. Write a short note on Regur soil.
Answer:

Regur soil:

Black soil, also known as regur soil, is formed from weathered basaltic rocks. The major characteristics of regur soil are as follows-

The rich content of iron, potash, lime, calcium, aluminium and organic matter. The poor concentration of nitrogen, and phosphorus.

High water-retention capacity. Clayey with extremely fine texture. This soil becomes sticky when it gets wet. It is extremely fertile soil.

Cotton grows well on this soil. So, regur soil is also known as ‘black cotton soil’. Apart from this sugarcane and groundnut are also cultivated on this soil.

Question 3. Write a short note on Red soil.
Answer:

Red soil:

Metamorphosed rocks break down into pieces over a long period to form red soil.

The major characteristics of red soil are as follows-

High iron content leads to its reddish appearance. Usually deficient in nitrogen, humus and phosphorus, but rich in potash.

It has poor water retention capacity. This is a highly porous soil and less crystalline in nature.

This is less fertile soil. Cultivation is possible only with the help of irrigation and fertilisers. Ragi, nuts, tobacco, paddy and chick-pea are cultivated on this soil.

Question 4. Write a short note on laterite soil.
Answer:

laterite soil:

Location of laterite soil in India: This soil is found in the Chotanagpur plateau, parts of the Eastern and Western Ghats and most parts of the Meghalaya plateau.

Characteristics: The characteristics of laterite soil are-

1. Amount of iron oxide: The amount of iron oxide in laterite soil is too much. Due to the high content, the colour of this soil is dark red.

2. Fertility: This soil is basically infertile. Importance of crop produced: Peanuts, sorghum, millet etc. are grown in this soil.

Question 5. Laterite Soil is Extremely infertile-state Why.
Answer:

Laterite Soil is Extremely infertile-state:

Laterite soils are found in areas with high temperatures and heavy rainfall.

The changes in the wet and dry seasons lead to the washing away of silica and lime components of the rocks to the lower layers and a soil rich in oxides of iron and aluminium compounds is left behind.

The soil also has a poor concentration of nitrogen, Laterite also has a very low water-retention capacity.

As a result, this soil becomes so hard and all these reasons together enhance the infertility of laterite soil.

Question 6. Write a short note on Montane soil or Mountainous soil.
Answer:

Montane soil forms in the humid temperate climate.

The major characteristics of montane soil are as follows—

  1. Contains a high concentration of organic matter and is generally acidic in nature.
  2. Rich in humus and is most fertile.
  3. The colour is generally brown and sometimes, may also be grey.
  4. Good for the cultivation of crops like tea, coffee, wheat, maize, barley, and a range of fruits and spices.
  5. Suitable for the growth of coniferous forests.

Question 7. Differentiate between Bhangar and Khadar.
Answer:

The differences between Bhangar and Khadar are as follows—

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India points of difference bhangar and khadar

Question 8. Differentiate between montane soil and desert soil.
Answer:

The differences between montane soil and desert soil are as follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India points of difference Montane and desert soil

Question 9. Differentiate between Black soil and red soil.
Answer:

The differences between Black soil and red soil Are as follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India Soil type

Question 10. Earthworm is beneficial for the fertility of soil’—Explain.
Answer:

Earthworm is beneficial for the fertility of soil:

Earthworms are insects that live in the soil and churn the soil thoroughly. In the process, the chemicals and the organic components of the soil mix together.

Moreover, earthworms improve the drainage and the soil structure making the soil more fertile. The organic remains of the dead earthworms also enhance soil fertility. So, earthworms are beneficial for the fertility of the soil.

Question 11. Cherrapunji receives high rainfall but is not suitable for agriculture. Explain why.
Answer:

Cherrapunji receives high rainfall but is not suitable for agriculture:

Cherrapunji receives high rainfall and water is an essential component of agriculture. But excessive rainfall in Cherrapunji causes the topsoil along the hill slopes to be washed away.

This even leads to winter drought-like conditions and affects the vegetation cover. Moreover, the soil cover of Cherrapunji is of laterite type which is not very fertile. So, it is not suitable for agriculture even though it receives plenty of rainfall in the world.

Question 12. What are the prominent ill effects of soil erosion?
Answer:

Prominent ill effects of soil erosion:

Soil is a precious resource. Soil erosion leads to various ill effects on the biosphere as a whole.

They are as follows—

1. Agriculture becomes difficult and sometimes even impossible.

2. Eroded soil settles as deposits on nearby riverbeds causing sedimentation. Thus decreasing the water-holding capacity and navigability of the rivers. This, in turn, may result in floods.

3. Increase the salinity of the soil.

Question 13. Discuss the various methods of soil conservation.
Answer:

Soil supports life. So, it is essential to conserve soil.

The following are some of the important methods of soil conservation—

  1. Prevent deforestation and promote afforestation.
  2. Adopt healthy farming practices such as contour farming, terrace farming, crop rotation, subsistence farming and others.
  3. Create windbreaks-breaks created by planting trees on the windward side of a mountain slope prevents soil erosion.
  4. Prevent unnecessary construction-roads, brick kilns and so on.
  5. Uncontrolled grazing should be restricted.

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. What is meant by soil?
Answer:

Soil:

Soil is the thin, top layer of the land surface. The life and habitat of the flora and the fauna, human life, agriculture and crop yield all are dependent on soil.

The nature and quality of the soil are important. The biosphere is directly or indirectly dependent on the soil cover. Rocks, organic matter of dead plants and animals, minerals, water and air all help in soil formation.

Question 2. Name the factors on which the formation of soll depends which the
Answer:

The factors on which the formation of soil depends are as follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India Factors of soil formation

Question 3. What is meant by fertile soil?
Answer:

Fertile soil:

The soil that is rich in components useful for basic plant nutrition, including nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium is known as fertile soil.

It must also contain ample amounts of minerals such as zinc, manganese, iron, sulphur, magnesium, copper, chlorine, cobalt and other organic matter.

Question 3. Why is soil called the gift of nature?
Answer:

Soil called the gift of nature:

Man uses the soil but cannot create it. The rock is crushed to form soil. The soil contains various minerals, water and organisms.

On soil, trees grow, people cultivate, and crops grow and thus soil is created by the nature. So the soil is called the gift of nature.

Question 5. How does soil support life on Earth?
Answer:

Soil support life on Earth:

Trees grow only in the soil. The flowers, fruits or crops of the tree provide us with food. Not just food, trees help animals or humans to survive in many ways.

So, the soil supports life both directly and indirectly. It is true that we survive because there is soil.

Question 6. Why does laterite soil appear reddish?
Answer:

Laterite soil appear reddish:

Laterite soil is found in areas of high temperature and heavy rainfall.

The heavy rainfall washes away several mineral components from the top layer, to the bottom layers, leaving behind iron oxides on the top layer. The presence of iron oxide makes the soil appears reddish in colour.

Question 7. Why is black soil black in colour?
Answer:

Black soil black in colour:

Basaltic rocks disintegrate to form black soil. These soils are black in colour because the colour of the parent rock i.e. basalt is dark in colour.

Moreover, this soil contains a huge amount of organic matter which adds dark colour to the soil.

Question 8. Mention why is the soil of the Chotanagpur plateau region not suitable for agriculture.
Answer:

The soil of the Chotanagpur plateau region is mainly red soil or lateritic soil. This soil is rich in iron oxides. That is why this soil is red in colour.

In addition to this, the water-holding capacity and organic matter content are very low. So, this soil is very infertile. Therefore, such soil is unfit for cultivation.

Question 9. What is meant by soil conservation?
Answer:

Soil conservation:

Soil conservation refers to a combination of measures taken to protect soil and prevent its erosion.

Through the various soil conservation measures, the following preventive actions are taken Prevention from physical erosion of the soil, by the agents of erosion.

Prevention from chemical alteration because of overuse, acidification and salinization. Prevention from biological alteration.

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. The existence of is beneficial for the fertility of soils—

  1. Termites
  2. Earthworms
  3. Mice

Answer: 2. Earthworms

Question 2. Fertile and newly-formed alluvial soils are known as—

  1. Bhangar
  2. Khadar
  3. Podzol

Answer: 2. Khadar

Question 3. Soil is formed from basalt rocks—

  1. Laterite
  2. Alluvial
  3. Black

Answer: 3. Alluvial

Question 4. Laterite soil is in colour—

  1. Brick-red
  2. Jet-black
  3. Greyish-brown

Answer: 1. Brick-red

Question 5. Regur soil is in colour—

  1. Red
  2. Black
  3. Brown

Answer: 2. Black

Question 6. Black soil is rich in—

  1. Calcium carbonate
  2. Iron oxide
  3. Magnesium chloride

Answer: 1. Calcium carbonate

Question 7. Laterite soil is rich in—

  1. Calcium carbonate
  2. Iron oxide
  3. Magnesium chloride

Answer: 2. Iron oxide

Question 8. This crop grows well in desert soil—

  1. Paddy
  2. Wheat
  3. Millet

Answer: 3. Millet

Question 9. This soil is found in floodplains of the rivers—

  1. Alluvial
  2. Sandy
  3. Montane

Answer: 1. Alluvial

Question 10. Soil covers the Chhota Nagpur plateau—

  1. Black
  2. Laterite
  3. Loamy

Answer: 2. Laterite

Question 11. Soil is considered to be the best for growing spices—

  1. Black
  2. Montane
  3. Red

Answer: 2. Montane

Question 12. Grows best in laterite soil—

  1. Jute
  2. Paddy
  3. Groundnut

Answer: 3. Groundnut

Question 13. In Punjab, the floodplains formed by repeated deposition of khadar soil is also known as—

  1. Bet
  2. Dhaya
  3. Regur

Answer: 1. Bet

Question 14. The central soil and water conservation research & training institute is located in—

  1. Kolkata
  2. Dehradun
  3. Asansol

Answer: 2. Dehradun

Question 15. In Punjab, bhangra soil plains are also known as—

  1. Bet
  2. Dhaya
  3. Laterite

Answer: 2. Dhaya

Question 16. The soil in Rajasthan is—

  1. Highly fertile
  2. Moderately fertile
  3. Not fertile

Answer: 3. Not fertile

Question 17. Soil is suitable for the cultivation of coffee—

  1. Alluvial
  2. Mountain
  3. Desert

Answer: 2. Mountain

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Fill In The Blanks

Question 1. ___________is the most fertile soil in India.
Answer: Alluvial

Question 2. Jowar, bajra and ragi are collectively known as ___________
Answer: Millets

Question 3. ___________soil is also known as ’Regur’ soil.
Answer: Black

Question 4. ___________ cultivation checks soil erosion on the hill slopes.
Answer: Step/terrace

Question 5. ___________ is the major cause of soil erosion.
Answer: Deforestation

Question 6. ___________ Alluvial soil is very fertile.
Answer: Loamy

Question 7. The Latin word ‘later’ means ___________
Answer: Brick

Question 8. Mustard, sesame and sunflower are good examples of ___________
Answer: Oilseeds

Question 9. A___________ soil develops with the greater passage of time in the formative years.
Answer: Developed

Question 10. Bhur, Rehu and Kallar are the local names of ___________ soil.
Answer: Desert

Question 11. Crops of the millets family grow best in the ___________ soil.
Answer: Desert

Question 12. ___________ soil covers the largest expanse of land in India.
Answer: Alluvial

Question 13. ___________ soil is rich in organic matter.
Answer: Mountain

Question 14. The soil found around a pond is rich in ___________
Answer: Organic matter

Question 15. The word ‘Podzol’ means ___________
Answer: Under-ash

Question 16. ___________ soil is suitable for tea plantations.
Answer: Mountain

Question 17. Less fertile old alluvium is known as ___________
Answer: Bhangar

Question 18. ___________ soil is found in the plateau region of Meghalaya.
Answer: Laterite

Question 19. ___________ soil can be seen in the Nilgiri Hills of the south.
Answer: Mountain

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Write True Or False

Question 1. Alluvial soil is suitable for the cultivation of both paddy and wheat.
Answer: True

Question 2. Red soil can be found in the Darjeeling district of West Bengal.
Answer: False

Question 3. Cotton grows well in black soil.
Answer: True

Question 4. Coconut and areca nuts are cultivated in the soils of the coastal regions.
Answer: True

Question 5. The fertility of soil increases with an increase in its water-holding capacity.
Answer: True

Question 6. Soils having the colour of darker shades absorb lesser heat.
Answer: False

Question 7. More porous the soil, the more its fertility.
Answer: False

Question 8. Soils rich in iron oxide are reddish in colour.
Answer: True

Question 9. Soils with higher concentrations of organic matter are more acidic in nature.
Answer: True

Question 10. Terracotta articles—well-known handicraft products of Bishnupur are made out of burnt red soil.
Answer: True

Question 11. Jhum Cultivation on the slopes of hills leads to the erosion of soil.
Answer: True

Question 12. Soil erosion can be checked with the help of afforestation.
Answer: True

Question 13. Grazing enhances soil fertility.
Answer: False

Question 14. The cultivation of leguminous crops helps in enhancing the fertility of the soil.
Answer: True

Question 15. The texture of the soil tells us if the soil particles are coarse or fine.
Answer: True

Question 16. Coastal soils are generally saline,
Answer: True

Question 17. Sandy soil can hold more water.
Answer: False

Question 18. Coniferous trees grow well in podzol soil.
Answer: True

Question 19. Cherrapunji in Meghalaya is prone to soil erosion.
Answer: True

Question 20. Laterite is fertile soil.
Answer: False

Question 21. Jhum cultivation is done either by cutting terraces or by slash-burning the forests on the hill slopes.
Answer: True

Question 22. Montane soils are rich in humus.
Answer: True

Question 23. Cacti grow well in saline delta soils.
Answer: False

Question 24. Excessive soil erosion is seen at Cherrapunji in the state of Meghalaya.
Answer: True

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Match The Following

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India match the following
Answer: 1-E,2-A,3-B,4-C,5-D

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic D Soils In India match the following (2)
Answer: 1-C,2-D,3-B,4-E,5-F,6-A

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic D Soils In India Answer In One Or Two Words

Question 1. Name the major constituent of any soil.
Answer: Minerals, organic matter.

Question 2. Which insect is considered to be a friend of the soil?
Answer: Earthworm.

Question 3. Name the soil found on the floodplains formed by the rivers.
Answer: Alluvial soil.

Question 4. Name two fertile soils found in India.
Answer: Alluvial soil and Black soil.

Question 5. Into how many types can alluvial soil be classified on the basis of where it occurs and its age?
Answer: 2 types (Bhangar and Khadar).

Question 6. From which type of rocks is red soil formed?
Answer: Metamorphic Rocks.

Question 7. Where do plants derive their nutrients from?
Answer: Soil.

Question 8. In which climate can laterite soil be found in abundance?
Answer: Hot and wet tropical areas.

Question 9. From which rocks are regur soil formed?
Answer: Basalt rocks.

Question 10. Name the soil that can be found in the states of Maharashtra and Gujarat.
Answer: Black soil.

Question 11. What type of soil is common in areas with high temperatures and low rainfall?
Answer: Desert soil.

Question 12. What would be the colour of iron-rich soil?
Answer: Red.

Question 13. What type of soil is common in the delta areas?
Answer: Alluvial soil.

Question 14. What type of soil can be found in the Meghalaya Plateau?
Answer: Laterite soil.

Question 15. Which component is prominent in desert soil?
Answer: Salt.

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Our Country India Topic C Climate Of India

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Analytical Type Questions

 

Question 1. Discuss the seasonal characteristics of the climate of India. Or, Discuss the cycle of seasons in India. Or, Discuss how the monsoon winds influence the climate of India.
Answer:  Temperature, rainfall, wind direction, atmospheric pressure, and other such factors determine the categorization of the four seasons in India.

These seasons are characterized as described below: Summer (March to May)

Sunrays fall directly over most parts of the country, so the average temperature is high during this time.

Many places in the states of Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Odisha and West Bengal experience temperatures higher than 40°C. In the deserts of Rajasthan, the temperature rises above 48°C.

Waterbodies in many places are dry The temperature in coastal regions and hilly regions remains up due to the extreme heat. Moderate.

During the days, hot dry wind known as ‘Loo’ often blows over the northern and north-western parts of the country. Monsoon June to September)

The low-pressure areas created over northwest India in the summer causes moisture-laden southwest monsoon winds to rush in from over the surrounding waterbodies from June to September.

The southwest monsoon winds have two branches. The Arabian Sea branch and the Bay of Bengal branch.

This wind causes heavy to moderate rainfall during this entire period in most parts of the country.

Retreating monsoon (October to November) During this period, the sun starts its apparent southward movement. The Indian landmass starts receiving more oblique rays from the sun.

The temperature of the landmass starts decreasing. Also, southwest monsoon winds start retreating from India.

These retreating winds collect moisture from the Bay of Bengal and cause rainfall on the Coromandel Coast. Sometimes, storms occur in West Bengal-this is known locally as Aashwiner Jhor.

In Winter (December to February) India receives oblique rays of the sun and so, the temperature is low and the atmospheric pressure is high.

Cool, dry winds blow over India from the north-eastern direction. Sometimes, the Western Disturbances cause rainfall in northwest India. Snowfall occurs in mountainous and hilly regions.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India Directions of monsson winds

Question 2 Write the differences between the onset of monsoon and the retreat of monsoon.
Answer: The differences between the onset and retreat of monsoon are as follows-

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India points of difference Onset and retreat of monsoons

 

Question 3. Describe your favorite season.
Answer:  My favorite season is autumn

Time of the season: India experiences autumn during the months of October and November.

Climatic characteristics of the season: The average temperature of this season ranges from 25°C- 30°C and the average rainfall is around 100 cm or more.

Cyclones known as ‘Aashwiner Jhor’ are frequent in this season. The skies remain clear with cotton-like clouds floating by during the daytime.

While dew drops are common during nighttime. The early morning hours are foggy at times.

Seasonal crops: Paddy is harvested in this season and several other vegetables are also grown around this time.

Festivals of the season: Durga Puja, Kali Puja, Diwali, and Lakshmi Puja are some of the important festivals that are celebrated in this season.

Lifestyle during this season: The festive spirit all around during this time induces happiness and uplifts people’s mood.

Question 4. Discuss how the monsoon winds influence life in India.
Answer: The monsoon winds affect and influence almost every aspect of life in India.

Some of these are as follows:

1. Agriculture: Agriculture in India is largely dependent on monsoon winds. The cultivation of paddy, wheat, jute, sugarcane, and tea is completely dependent on rainfall.

2. Agro-industries: Tea, jute, and sugarcane are all agricultural products that serve as raw materials for agro-based industries like tea, jute, sugar, etc. Since the production of these crops is dependent on monsoon winds, by extension, these industries are also dependent on monsoon winds.

3. Economic development: Since India is an agriculture-based economy the economic welfare of India is dependent on monsoon winds.

When the country receives adequate rainfall, economic progress is witnessed because production is higher.

Conversely, when rainfall is inadequate or excessive – causing crop failure or damage to crops, the economy suffers.

4. Forests: Rainfall, temperature, humidity, soil and the slope of the land are all factors that influence the growth of forest land in various parts of the country.

This is why areas with heavy rainfall have evergreen forests and those with less rainfall have deciduous vegetation or scrubland.

Forestry-based industries like timber, paper, and so on are dependent on these forests.

5. Foreign exchange earnings: The export of tea, jute, textiles, and sugar are all foreign exchange earners for India. Production of these crops is completely dependent on monsoon winds.

6. Hydro-electricity: The water required for hydroelectric power generation is acquired from the rivers which are dependent on the monsoon.

During monsoon, the volume of water in the rivers increases rapidly which helps to generate hydroelectricity.

7. Festivals: Many festivals like the Onam in Kerala, and Bihu in Assam are celebrated during the monsoons.

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Short Analytical Type Questions

Question 1. What are the special characteristics of India’s climate?
Answer: The special characteristics of India’s climate are as follows:

1. Season change: India experiences four distinct seasons-summer, monsoon, retreating monsoon, and winter.

2. Wet summers and dry winters: In India, monsoon winds cause heavy rainfall during summers, but winters are dry. But, northwest India and the Coromandel Coast do receive some rainfall in winter as well.

3. Reversal in wind direction: In India, the wind direction in summer (southwest monsoon winds blowing from sea to land) sees a complete reversal in winter (northeast monsoon winds blowing from land to sea).

Question 2 Discuss how the Himalayas influence the climate of India.
Answer: The massive mountain range of the Himalayas that stand on the northern borders of India like a fortress, influences our country’s climate to a great extent.

This happens in the following ways:

1. Prevents severe winters: The Himalayas prevent the extremely cold winds blowing southward from Siberia, from entering India.

2. Helps in rainfall: When the moisture-laden southwest monsoon winds hit the Himalayas, they shed moisture at the foothills and on their way up the slopes.

3. Restricts the influence of Western Disturbance: Due to the presence of the Himalayas, the Western Disturbance that occurs in winter is restricted to northwest India. This winter rainfall in the northwest is good for certain crops.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India The himalays and the mansoon winds

 

Question 3. Why is the average temperature in the southern part of the Tropic of Cancer usually more? Or, Why is the average temperature in the southern part of India always higher?
Answer: The Tropic of Cancer runs almost through the middle of India – this the area that is to the south of the Tropic of Cancer or southern India lies in the torrid zone.

The torrid zone receives vertical rays of the sun almost throughout the year. This is why the temperature remains high over here throughout the year. Generally, this region experiences an average temperature of about 27°C.

Question 4. In which district of West Bengal do you reside? Is it hot or cold for the major part of the year in your village or city? At which time of the year do you use the umbrella, raincoat, sweater, jacket, or muffler?
Answer: I live in the North 24 Parganas district of West Bengal.

It is hot here for the major part of the year. I use raincoats and umbrellas during the months of June-September. Sweaters, jackets, and mufflers are used in the months of December- February.

Question 5. Why does the temperature drop with an increase in the elevation of land?
Answer:  We know that the temperature starts decreasing with an increase in elevation or altitude. Every 1000-meter rise in elevation lowers the temperature by 6.5°C.

This is why Shimla is colder than Delhi. The reasons for the drop in temperature with the rise in altitude are as follows The sun’s rays first heat up the surface of the earth, which then radiates heat into the atmosphere.

This is why the lower layers of the atmosphere are the hottest. As we move up, the atmosphere receives less heat from the surface of the earth and thus is cooler.

The lower layers of the atmosphere are denser than the upper layers. This means that the air of the upper layers absorbs less amount and remains cooler than a lower layer of air.

The places closer to the earth’s surface experience more atmospheric pressure and are hence warmer.

The upper layers of the atmosphere have fewer water droplets, dust particles, and other impurities which absorb and retain heat. So the upper layers are cooler.

Question 6. Do you like the summer months? Why? Write it down.
Answer: Yes, I do like summers. Summer is the season of my favorite fruits such as Mango, Litchi, Jackfruit, etc.

Flowers such as tuberose, jasmine, and gardenia all bloom during this time. Thus, summer is my favorite season.

Question 7. What are monsoon winds? What are the special characteristics of monsoon winds?
Answer: The word monsoon has come from the Arabic word ‘Mausam’ meaning season. This means that the winds that are generated when seasons change are called monsoon winds.

Special characteristics of monsoon winds are as follows-

Since monsoon winds blow from the southwest, in summer they collect a lot of moisture from the surrounding waterbodies and hence, cause rainfall over the Indian landmass.

In winter, monsoon winds blow in the opposite direction to that in which it blows in summer, i.e. from the land towards the sea and thus these winds are dry Only the Coromondal coast receives rainfall from the monsoon winds in winter.

Rainfall is not regular, it is intermittent and erratic. The amount of rainfall received decreases from east to west. The amount of rainfall received all over the country is also not equal.

Thus there are floods and droughts. Indian agriculture and economy are highly dependent on the monsoon winds.

Question 8. Describe the southwest monsoon wind.
Answer: The wind that causes rain in India in summer is known as the southwest monsoon.

Origin: In summer (May-June), a low-pressure area forms in north-western India due to a sharp rise in temperature.

On the other hand, a high-pressure area forms over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea due to relatively low temperatures.

As a result, moisture-laden southwest monsoon winds rush toward the Indian sub-continent from those water bodies.

Branch: South-west monsoon winds are divided into two branches-Arabian Sea branch and the Bay of Bengal branch.

The branch coming from the Arabian Sea gets obstructed in the Western Ghats and causes heavy rainfall on the west coast of India.

The branch coming from the Bay of Bengal gets obstructed in the Meghalaya Khasi, and Jayantia hills and causes heavy rainfall in eastern India.

Temperature, rainfall, wind direction, atmospheric pressure, and other factors determine the categorization of the four seasons in India.

These seasons are characterized as described below: Summer (March to May)

Sunrays fall directly over most parts of the country, so the average temperature is high during this time.

Many places in the states of Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Odisha and West Bengal experience temperatures higher than 40°C. In the deserts of Rajasthan, the temperature rises above 48°C.

Waterbodies in many places are dry The temperature in coastal regions and hilly regions remains up due to the extreme heat. Moderate.

During the days, hot dry wind known as ‘Loo’ often blows over the northern and north-western parts of the country. Monsoon June to September)

The low-pressure areas created over northwest India in the summer causes moisture-laden southwest monsoon winds to rush in from over the surrounding waterbodies from June to September.

The southwest monsoon winds have two branches. The Arabian Sea branch and the Bay of Bengal branch.

This wind causes heavy to moderate rainfall during this entire period in most parts of the country.

Retreating monsoon (October to November) During this period, the sun starts its apparent southward movement. The Indian landmass starts receiving more oblique rays from the sun.

The temperature of the landmass starts decreasing. Also, southwest monsoon winds start retreating from India.

These retreating winds collect moisture from the Bay of Bengal and cause rainfall on the Coromandel Coast. Sometimes, storms occur in West Bengal-this is known locally as Aashwiner Jhor.

In Winter (December to February) India receives oblique rays of the sun and so, the temperature is low and the atmospheric pressure is high.

Cool, dry winds blow over India from the north-eastern direction. Sometimes, the Western Disturbances cause rainfall in northwest India. Snowfall occurs in mountainous and hilly regions.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India Directions of monsson winds

 

Question 10. Write a short note on Loo and Aandhi.
Answer: Loo: The northern states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Bihar sometimes experience a sudden rise in temperatures during summer afternoons.

This heatwave is locally called ‘Loo’. This heat wave can cause temperatures to rise up by 20°-25°C in one go.

Temperature, rainfall, wind direction, atmospheric pressure, and other factors determine the categorization of the four seasons in India.

These seasons are characterized as described below: Summer (March to May)

Sunrays fall directly over most parts of the country, so the average temperature is high during this time.

Many places in the states of Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Odisha and West Bengal experience temperatures higher than 40°C. In the deserts of Rajasthan, the temperature rises above 48°C.

Waterbodies in many places are dry The temperature in coastal regions and hilly regions remains up due to the extreme heat. Moderate.

During the days, hot dry wind known as ‘Loo’ often blows over the northern and north-western parts of the country. Monsoon June to September)

The low-pressure areas created over northwest India in the summer causes moisture-laden southwest monsoon winds to rush in from over the surrounding waterbodies from June to September.

The southwest monsoon winds have two branches. The Arabian Sea branch and the Bay of Bengal branch.

This wind causes heavy to moderate rainfall during this entire period in most parts of the country.

Retreating monsoon (October to November) During this period, the sun starts its apparent southward movement. The Indian landmass starts receiving more oblique rays from the sun.

The temperature of the landmass starts decreasing. Also, southwest monsoon winds start retreating from India.

These retreating winds collect moisture from the Bay of Bengal and cause rainfall on the Coromandel Coast. Sometimes, storms occur in West Bengal-this is known locally as Aashwiner Jhor.

In Winter (December to February) India receives oblique rays of the sun and so, the temperature is low and the atmospheric pressure is high.

Cool, dry winds blow over India from the north-eastern direction. Sometimes, the Western Disturbances cause rainfall in northwest India. Snowfall occurs in mountainous and hilly regions.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India Directions of monsson winds

 

Question 9. Describe the northeast monsoon wind.
Answer: The cold and dry winds that blow from the northeast direction of India in winter (December-February) is known as the northeast monsoon these dry dust storms are called Aandhi. High temperatures of about 50°C often cause deaths of human beings and livestock.

Question 11. Write a short note on Kalbaishakhi or Nor’westers.
Answer: The type of storm accompanied by thunder, lightning, and heavy rainfall that occurs

Characteristics: The characteristics of the north-east during summers in West Bengal known as monsoon are-

1. Nature: This wind is cold and dry in nature.

2. Direction of flow: This wind flows from the land towards waterbodies.

3. Rainfall: The amount of water vapor is very low in this wind. So, there is little rainfall in India.

4. Feelings of winter: Winter is felt in India due to the influence of the northeast monsoon winds.

Question 12. Differentiate between Loo and Kalbaishakhi.
Answer: Differences between Loo and Kalbaishakhi are as follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India points of difference loo and kalbaishakhi

Question 13. Why do certain parts of India experience droughts whereas some parts experience floods?
Answer:  India is a country whose climate is governed by the monsoon winds. We receive rainfall primarily because of the monsoon winds.

Both droughts and floods are a result of the action of monsoon winds and India is thus known for both.

The reasons for floods and droughts are as follows-

Reasons for floods in India: If the onset of monsoon occurs before the schedule the amount of rainfall received would be more as the season would last longer.

If the monsoon wind retreats late the season lasts longer. If it keeps raining continuously for days at a stretch.

Reasons for droughts in India: Inadequate rainfall caused by monsoon winds is the primary reason for droughts in India. If the onset of the monsoon is delayed, the season is short-lived.

If the monsoon retreats early, the season is short-lived. If during monsoon, suddenly there is no rainfall for many days at a stretch.

Question 14. Meghalaya receives heavy rainfall. Explain why.
Answer: Meghalaya is situated in the northeastern region of our country.

The moisture-laden monsoon winds that blow in from the Bay of Bengal do not meet any high land before reaching the plateau region that extends from the east to the west of Meghalaya.

As the wind rises along the southern slope of the plateau, it becomes colder and condensation occurs. As a result, this region receives heavy rainfall.

Mawsynram and Cherrapunji on the southern slope of the Khasi, Jayantia hills receive the highest amount of rainfall in the world. The average annual rainfall here is about 11,872mm.

Question 15. Delhi experiences a continental type of climate, while Mumbai enjoys a maritime climate. Explain why.
Answer: Being situated far from the seas, there is little or no influence of the seas on the weather of Delhi. So it is very hot during the day or in summer and very cold at night or in winter.

Due to this, the climate of Delhi is extreme or of the continental type. On the other hand, Mumbai is located on the coast. So the temperature in Mumbai is not too much or too little.

Besides, the effect of humid sea breeze cannot increase the intensity of temperature.

So it does not feel very hot during the day or in summer and very cold at night or in winter. For this reason, the climate of Mumbai is moderate or maritime.

Question 16. Write a short note on ‘Aashwiner Jhor’.
Answer: The cyclonic rain that occurs in Bangladesh, West Bengal, and some other parts of eastern India in the months of October and November (Ashwin-Kartick in the Indian calendar) is locally known as ‘Aashwiner Jhor’.

Storms with rainfall occur in coastal areas. These storms often cause damage to crops, and habitats, as well as loss of livestock and life. These cause rainfall also in the states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, and Kerala.

Question 17. Write a short note on ‘Western Disturbances’.
Answer: During the months of December to February, the winter season prevails in India. At this time, the sun’s apparent southward movement causes the weather in India to become dry and cold.

Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, and Haryana experience cloudy skies accompanied by rainfall. This happens because of storms originating in and around the Mediterranean Sea. Since this comes from the West, it is known as Western Disturbance.

Question 18. Write a short note on the rainshadow region.
Answer: The side of a mountain or a hill that does not receive rainfall is known as the leeward side and the area around it is called the rainshadow region.

This is because when moisture-laden winds hit the windward side of a mountain, it causes heavy rainfall there.

When this wind crosses the peak of the mountain and reaches the other side, the leeward side, its moisture content decreases.

These winds flow down the slope of the mountain, thus causing the temperature to rise and eliminating any chance for condensation to occur.

Example: The leeward side of the Western Ghats (eastern side) and the Meghalaya plateau are rainshadow regions.

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India rain shoadow region

 

Question 19. Differentiate between the Arabian Sea branch and the Bay of Bengal branch of the southwest monsoon.
Answer:  The differences between the Arabian Sea branch and the Bay of Bengal branch

Are as follows-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India points of difference arabian sea branch bay of bengal branch

Question 20. Compare the climatic characteristics of summer and winter in India.
Answer: Comparison of climatic characteristics of summer and winter in India-

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India points of difference Summer climate and winter climate

Question 21. Why does the Coromandel Coast receive rainfall twice a year?
Answer: The Coromandel Coast receives rainfall twice a year.

This is because of the following reasons:

1. South-west monsoon: First, from June to September, the southwest monsoon winds bring rainfall to this region along with the rest of the country.

2. North-east monsoon: Then, the retreating monsoon winds i.e. northeast monsoon again cause rainfall here.

The retreating monsoon winds gather a lot of moisture while passing over the Bay of Bengal in autumn and this moisture is precipitated on the Coromandel Coast during early winter.

Question 22. Why are the agriculture and economy of India so dependent on monsoon winds?
Answer: Both the agriculture and the economy of India are greatly dependent on monsoon winds. The reasons are discussed hereafter there is drizzle for a couple of days. It is known as Western disturbances.

1. Effect of monsoon on agriculture: Depending on the relationship and balance between temperature and rainfall, different kinds of cultivation and cultivation practices are carried out in different parts of India.

Floods, droughts, and irregular of rainfall occupy an important place in the lives of farmers. Industries that are dependent on agriculture-like the tea industry, jute, sugar, and handloom are all affected if agriculture is affected.

2. Effect of monsoon on the economy: Apart from agro-based activities and industries, transfer: portation and tourism are also greatly dependent on the advent and retreat of monsoons in India.

For instance, hill stations like Darjeeling, Gangtok, and Shimla all attract tourists. But excessive rainfall, landslides, and damage to roads often make these places inaccessible. So, tourism is also affected.

Also, hydroelectricity, drinking water supply, groundwater recharge, fishing, and navigation are also several activities that are dependent on rainfall.

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1. Why is Shimla so cold?
Answer: Shimla is at an altitude of about 2400 meters above sea level. We know that with the rise in altitude, there is a drop in temperature.

For every 1000 meters increase in altitude, the temperature drops by 6.5°C. So, it is cold in Shimla. For the same reason, Darjeeling is colder than Siliguri and the tops of high mountains are perpetually snow-capped.

Question 2. Why does it feel so hot during the daytime in plateau regions?
Answer: Generally, plateaus are at an elevation of about 600-900 meters above sea level and the surface of the plateau areas is usually rocky in nature.

These rocky surfaces absorb heat from the sun’s rays very fast and also radiate heat very fast as soon as night falls.

Also, plateaus usually do not have many trees so they experience less rainfall and the temperature remains high.

Question 3. Why is the range of temperature in desert Plateau regions are also located away from the region of Rajasthan so high? Or, Rajasthan experiences very hot temperatures during the day but cold temperatures at night. State why.
Answer: Rajasthan is a desert. The sun’s rays heat up the sand of the region very quickly and as a result, days are extremely hot.

Again, sand radiates heat very fast, and after sunset also the skies remain clear which helps the heat to escape quickly. As a result, the nights are cold.

Question 4. Why is the weather so pleasant in coastal regions? Or, Why does the climate become less moderate as one moves further away from the coast?
Answer: The farther a region is from the coast, the higher the range of temperature it experiences. These areas experience hot summers and cold winters.

This happens because, near the coast, land breezes and sea breezes blow alternately. This causes a balance of temperature-temperatures neither rise nor falls very much at these places.

So, the weather is always pleasant in coastal areas sea and thus experiences a continental type of climate.

Question 5. How much does the latitude of a place affect the life of the people of that place?
Answer: The latitude of a place is the chief factor that determines its climate. This is because the latitude of a place determines how much and what kind of sun rays (oblique or direct) it receives.

Nature and the amount of sun rays create differences in temperature. As we move from the Equator to the poles, the places start receiving more and more oblique rays of the sun.

Oblique sun rays fail to heat up an area as much as direct sun rays would. Thus the temperature remains low.

Question 6. What are the important factors affecting the climate of India?
Answer: The main factors affecting the climate of India are as follows- latitude 2 distance from the sea altitude of the land the position of the Himalayas and other mountain ranges presence of one on three sides 6 monsoon winds the desert Rajasthan to the west of India.

Question 7. Mention the duration of each season in India.
Answer: The duration of each season in India is tabulated below:

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India match the following

Question 8. Mention the names of climatic regions in India.
Answer: India can be divided into six climatic regions. They are—

  1. The tropical humid climatic region,
  2. The arid climatic region,
  3. The semi-arid climatic region,
  4. Tropical Savanna climatic region,
  5. The mountainous climatic region,
  6. Tropical extra-humid climatic region.

Question 9. Why is India said to have a monsoon type of climate?
Answer: The reason for designating India as a country of monsoon climate is—India’s climate is totally dependent on monsoon winds.

In winter, the temperature in India decreases due to the influence of northeast monsoon winds. In summer, the monsoon season begins in India due to the onset of southwest monsoon winds. So, India is said to have a monsoon type of climate.

Question 10. What are the weather conditions in India during summer?
Answer: The weather conditions in India during summer are almost every part of India experiences high temperatures during summer.

For instance, temperatures are about 48°C in Rajasthan, about S8°C in Gujarat, and so on.

During summer, the hot wind like Loo blows from the northwest and storms like Kaalboishakhi, Aandhi, and Bordoisila occur.

Question 11. What type of changes in weather are seen during Nor’wester?
Answer: In summer (April-May), West Bengal as well as eastern India sometimes experiences thunderstorms in the afternoon or evening.

This storm is known as Nor’wester. Due to the effect of this Nor’wester, air temperature drops, and the weather becomes comfortable for some period.

Question 12. What is the origin of the word ’monsoon?
Answer: The word ‘monsoon’ originates from the word ‘Mausim’ or ‘Mausam’ in Arabic meaning season. So, the winds that blow according to season are called monsoon winds. For instance, in India, southwest monsoon winds blow at the end of summer and in monsoon.

Question 13. Mention the different winds that blow over India in different seasons.
Answer: In India, at the end of summer and during the monsoon, the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal branches of the southwest monsoon blow, and in the winter, northeast monsoon winds blow.

Question 14. Why do the western slopes of the Western Ghats receive heavy rainfall?
Answer: During the monsoon season, southwest monsoon winds enter India from the Arabian Sea and get obstructed by the western slopes of the Western Ghats.

This wind contains a lot of water vapor, and for being obstructed this wind causes a lot of orographic rainfall in the region. This is the reason why the western slopes of the Western Ghats receive heavy rainfall.

Question 15. Which regions in India experience rainfall during winter?
Answer: In India, mainly two regions receive rainfall in winter.

Punjab and Haryana in the northwest, primarily as a result of the Western Disturbance and Coromandel Coast in Tamil Nadu because of the retreating monsoon.

Question 16. What is meant by ‘Aashwiner Jhor’?
Answer: During autumn, coastal areas sometimes experience cyclonic thunderstorms.

While the amount of rainfall may be insignificant, the storms can cause quite a lot of damage to property and life. Since this occurs in the Bengali month of ‘Aashwin’, it is called ‘Aashwiner Jhor’.

Question 17. What are the weather conditions in India during winter?
Answer: The weather conditions in India during winter are as follows-

In India, the average temperature during winter is quite low. For instance, temperatures are between 10°C and 15°C in north India and around 25°C in Tamil Nadu.

Though the Western Disturbance causes considerable rainfall in northwest India, winters are mainly dry throughout the country.

The sky remains cloudless. Fog in the morning and dew at night are common phenomena during this season.

Question 18. In India, summers are wet and winters are dry. State why. Or, Why are winters dry in India?
Answer: The onset of monsoon winds brings rain to India in summer.

This wind gathers moisture from the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal and causes precipitation during the months of June to September over the Indian landmass.

But in winter, the retreating monsoon winds travel from the land towards the sea, thus having no moisture content. As a result, winters are dry.

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1. India has—

  1. Two seasons
  2. Four seasons
  3. Six seasons

Answer: 2. Four seasons

Question 2. India’s climate is primarily—

  1. Equatorial
  2. Monsoon
  3. Temperate

Answer: 2. Monsoon

Question 3. ‘He northwestern in India are called—

  1. Kalbaishakhi
  2. Western disturbance
  3. Aashwiner Johor

Answer: 1. Kalbaishakhi

Question 4. Rainy season, the wind that blows over India is known as the—

  1. North-east monsoon wind
  2. South-west monsoon wind
  3. South-east trade wind

Answer: 2. South-west monsoon wind

Question 5. India mostly receives rainfall from the—

  1. Convection type
  2. Relief type
  3. Cyclonic type

Answer: 2. Relief type

Question 6. The average annual rainfall in india is—

  1. 150 Cm
  2. 120 Cm
  3. 280 Cm

Answer: 2. 120 Cm

Question 7. The Shillong plateau is on the—

  1. The windward side of a mountain
  2. The leeward side of a mountain
  3. Plateau region

Answer: 2. Leeward side of a mountain

Question 8. The coast that experiences rainfall twice in a year is—

  1. Coromandel
  2. Konkan
  3. Malabar

Answer: 1. Coromondal

Question 9. The average annual rainfall in Meghalaya is about—

  1. 11,872 Mm
  2. 12,670 Mm
  3. 10,872 Mm

Answer: 1. 11,872 Mm

Question 10. The retreating monsoon winds blow over the Indian landmass during the months of—

  1. March-may
  2. December-February
  3. October-November

Answer: 3. October-November

Question 11. The hot and dry dust storm that blows over north-western India is known as—

  1. Gandhi
  2. Loo
  3. Western disturbance

Answer: 1. Aandhi

Question 12. In India, the difference in humidity between summer and winter is—

  1. High
  2. Low
  3. Moderate

Answer: 1. High

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Fill In The Blanks

Question 1. The presence of the _______________ mountains keeps the climate of north India cool.
Answer: Himalaya

Question 2. The climate of the areas near the sea is known as _______________ climate.
Answer: Maritime/ moderate

Question 3. The climate of areas away from the sea is known as _______________ climate.
Answer: Continental/ Extreme

Question 4. The state of _______________ in India has a hot and dry desert climate.
Answer: Rajasthan

Question 5. The hot and dry heatwave that blows over Uttar Pradesh in summers is known as the _______________
Answer: Loo

Question 6. Generally, the onset of monsoon in India takes place in the month of _______________
Answer: June

Question 7. The onset of monsoon in India starts with the state of _______________ on the Malabar Coast.
Answer: Kerala

Question 8. Most of India’s rainfall is caused by the _______________ monsoon winds.
Answer: South-west

Question 9. The year when the monsoon winds are late, _______________ occur.
Answer: Droughts

Question 10. In India, the weather in the _______________ season is usually pleasant.
Answer: Autumn

Question 11. The retreating monsoon winds cause rain _______________ only over the coast of India.
Answer: Coromondal

Question 12. In India, autumn is also called the season of _______________ monsoon wind.
Answer: Retreating

Question 13. Kalbaishakhi storms are known as _______________ in Assam.
Answer: Borodoisila

Question 14. _______________ are known as mango showers or coffee showers in Kerala.
Answer: Nor’Westeres

Question 15. Sea breezes blow during the _______________
Answer: Daytime

Question 16. From December to February, it is _______________ season in India.
Answer: Winter

Question 17. In winter, _______________ dry monsoon winds blow over India.
Answer: North-west

Question 18. The weather phenomena that originate in the Mediterranean region and bring rain in India are known as _______________ Disturbance.
Answer: Western

 

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Write True Or False

Question 1. Kalbaishakhi storms occur in autumn.
Answer: False

Question 2. The Malabar coast is the region that receives the most rainfall in eastern India.
Answer: False

Question 3. The southwest monsoon winds bring rain to India.
Answer: True

Question 4. The word ‘Mausam’ means season.
Answer: False

Question 5. The aridest region in India is the Thar Desert in Rajasthan.
Answer: False

Question 6. The place that receives the highest amount of rainfall in India is Mawsynram in Meghalaya.
Answer: False

Question 7. Monsoon winds enter India from the state of Rajasthan.
Answer: False

Question 8. In India, southeast monsoon winds blow during the summer.
Answer: False

Question 9. India’s climate is exactly opposite to the climate of the Mediterranean.
Answer: True

Question 10. The range of temperature in the desert region of Rajasthan is very high.
Answer: True

Question 11. Since Shimla is near the sea, it experiences moderate temperatures.
Answer: False

Question 12. In India, the average temperature north of the Tropic of Cancer is lower than the average temperature in regions south of it.

Question 13. Since Bhopal in Madhya Pradesh is near to the sea, it is very hot in Bhopal during summers.
Answer: False

Question 14. Because of altitude, the temperatures in hilly regions remain cool even in summers.
Answer: True

Question 15. Loo is a hot and dry heatwave.
Answer: True

Question 16. Monsoon season in India is from March to May.
Answer: False

Question 17. The eastern slopes of the Western Ghat mountains are a rainshadow region.
Answer: True

Question 18. In the month of October, the Malabar Coast in Kerala receives rainfall for the second time in a year.
Answer: False

Question 19. Agriculture in India is heavily dependent on the monsoon winds.
Answer: True

Question 20. Mawsynram in Meghalaya experiences the highest rainfall in India.
Answer: True

Question 21. The Thar Desert in Rajasthan experiences the hottest temperature in the world.
Answer: False

Question 22. During the monsoons, moisture-laden winds rush in from the oceans towards the land.
Answer: True

Question 23. The winds traveling from the Mediterranean Sea cause the Western Disturbance in India.
Answer: True

Question 24. The Himalayan regions experience snowfall in winters.
Answer: True

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Match the columns

 

WBBSE Solutions For Class 6 Geography Chapter 10 Climate Of India Climate Of India match the following
Answer: 1-C,2-E,3-A,4-F,5-B,6-D

Chapter 10 Climate Of India Topic C Climate Of India Answer In One Or Two Words

Question 1. What Is the climate of West Bengal categorized as?
Answer: Tropical monsoon type.

Question 2. Name a place in South India that remains cold throughout the year.
Answer: Kodaikanal.

Question 3. What is the relation between temperature and altitude?
Answer: Temperature decreases with increasing altitude.

Question 4. Which mountain range has a great influence on the climate of India?
Answer: The Himalayas.

Question 5. During which months is it summer in India?
Answer: March-May.

Question 6. What sort of rainfall occurs during Kalbaishakhi storms?
Answer: Cyclonic rainfall.

Question 7. During which months do low-pressure regions develop over India?
Answer: May-June.

Question 8. Which type of monsoon winds blows over India in the rainy season?
Answer: South-west monsoon winds.

Question 9. Which two branches of monsoon winds cause rainfall in India during summer?
Answer: Arabian Sea branch and Bay of Bengal branch.

Question 10. What causes uneven distribution of rainfall over India?
Answer: Monsoon winds.

Question 11. What percentage of the total rainfall that India experiences occurs during monsoon?
Answer: 75 percent.

Question 12. Which part of India receives the highest rainfall?
Answer: Mawsynram in the northeast.

Question 13. Name one rainshadow region In India other than the eastern slope of the Western Ghats.
Answer: The Shillong Plateau.

Question 14. Which festival celebrates the onset of monsoon in Assam?
Answer: Bihu.

Question 15. In which season does ‘Ashwiner Jhar’ occur?
Answer: Autumn.

Question 16. Which coast of India receives rainfall twice a year?
Answer: Coromandel Coast.

Question 17. Name the state which receives rainfall twice a year.
Answer: Tamil Nadu.

Question 18. During which months of the year does rainfall occur in the Coromondal Coast?
Answer: In the months of June and then in October-November.

Question 19. In which season do we experience fog and dew?
Answer: Winter.

Question 20. In which season does the northeast monsoon wind blow?
Answer: Winter.

Question 21. In which season does the Western Disturbance occur in the north-western parts of India?
Answer: Winter.

Question 22. Which regions of India experience the coldest winters?
Answer: Leh and Dras of the Union Territory of Ladakh.